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The Louisiana Classicism of New Orleans, A. Hays Town and More

December 11-15, 2013

Tour Arranged by Classical Excursions

New Orleans – the name conjures up a city like no other in the nation – a city more Caribbean, more Spanish, more French, and truly more unique. Historically, its dramatic ups and downs saw it become the world’s leading exporter of cotton before the Civil War, the wealth of which created a rich array of fabulous architecture, and later, when new wealth from railroads, timber, and oil took over. New Orleans has also witnessed devastation from epidemics and war in the 19th century, economic depression, and severe weather conditions stemming from its location near the mouth of the Mississippi River.

With New Orleansians’ sheer persistence to let the good times roll, the city could be nicknamed the Comeback Kid. Its amazing heritage and history, its sense of living as each day comes along, its carefully guarded traditions and customs, and the preservation of its one-of-a-kind Creole architecture and infusion of newer classical architecture continue.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art is pleased to announce an exclusive tour titled “The Louisiana Classicism of New Orleans, A. Hays Town and More,” scheduled for December 11 – 15 (change of dates). This excursion will tie the best of the city’s traditional architecture and gardens, both public and private, with the very special vernacular (“elegant yet earthy”) work of Louisiana icon architect A. Hays Town (1903–2005). Part of a day will be spent in Baton Rouge, where the greatest concentration of his homes are situated given that he established his practice there. The tour will also include two of his most notable houses in New Orleans.

Growing up in Lafayette, Louisiana, Town practiced his profession for more than 65 years, inspired by the state’s Spanish, French, and Creole architectural history. He is considered Louisiana’s premier 20th-century residential architect, whose work has influenced other architects. Town is admired for his keen eye for symmetry and proportion, his early recycling of aged wood, brick, and stone, and his sensitive consideration of the local climate in his designs.

In between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, we will stop at two beautifully restored River Road Creole plantation houses, Evergreen (circa 1832) and Destrehan (circa 1840). In New Orleans, there will be historic houses to visit, including the fabulous Longue Vue House (1942) in Old Metarie with gardens designed by Ellen Biddle Shipman, and in the French Quarter, the Hermann-Grima House (1831) and the Gallier House (1857), the home of the leading New Orleans antebellum architects, James Gallier, father and son.

Architect Michael Carbine, who also owns Mac Maison Antiques, will host a reception at his spectacular home on Audubon Place, where we will visit two other homes in this historic district. We will also have entrée to a private home decorated by the celebrated British interior decorator, Nicky Haslam. The sophisticated talent of American decorator Keith Langham will be on display at another home. The gorgeous work of New Orleans’ leading decorating firm, Holden and Dupuy (known as the “Two Anns”) will be viewed at another private home. These homes, as well as the city as a whole, will be decorated (“big time” is the comment of one resident) for the Christmas holiday season.

There will be exclusive tours with architectural historians and specialists, and four nights of accommodations have been arranged at the elegant four-star Hotel Monteleone, an 1886 landmark located in the heart of the French Quarter. Shops and restaurants are within easy walking distance. The tour will begin Wednesday evening, December 11, with an opening dinner and lecture, and will end Sunday at noon, December 15. For inquiries, contact Tom Hayes at Classical Excursions, tom@classicalexcursions.com or (413) 243-4155.

Due to the private nature of many of the tour sites, they are subject to change while others will be added.


Baltimore: A Classical Architectural Heritage Discovered

September 26-29, 2013

Arranged by Classical Excursions

Architect David Gleason, member of the Baltimore Architecture Foundation board, has generously offered this narrative, entitled “The Architecture of Place, Baltimore’s Unique Design Aesthetic, 1790–1930” in preparation for an insightful tour of private and public sites. These visits, of which he and other experts will be a part, will represent the wealth of fine architecture he calls the Baltimore Style. David and his wife, Seema, have traveled with us as members of ICAA.

“Like all East Coast cities founded in the 18th century, Baltimore can trace its architectural pedigree to Georgian London. As the Colonial Period came to a close, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all adapted the Georgian precedent to meet local building traditions and social customs. Baltimore was no exception.

“Baltimore’s Georgian architecture, as reflected in the earlier plantation house of Mount Clare (1760), was reshaped over time by the delicate and refined style of Robert Adam. An example is the highly sophisticated and decorative designs of Homewood House (1801), the country seat of Charles Carroll, Jr. As this change influenced building design, the use of brick made from local clay, usually laid in Flemish bond only on the principal elevation, became standard practice. Later in the century, the refined character of the running bond of the distinctive Baltimore brick took hold.

While window sashes and trim were painted white, marble from surrounding quarries was used as decorative embellishments for the base, string courses, door surrounds, sills, and front steps to become hallmarks of Baltimore architecture well into the first quarter of the 20th century. A particular window and door frame profile, known as the Baltimore Bullnose, evolved, minimizing the wood frame while highlighting the brick opening.

“Three of the most prominent and creative architects of the new republic, Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764-1820), Maxmilian Godefroy (1765-1838) and Robert Mills (1771-1855), practiced in Baltimore during the first quarter of the 19th century, leaving a series of architectural masterpieces that still resonate. With the broad, unadorned surfaces of both Latrobe’s spectacular Roman Catholic Basilica of the Assumption (1805-1821) and Godefroy’s triple-arched First Unitarian Church (1818), the city’s architectural standards for the next 100 years were set.

“In Baltimore, good taste, refined materials, lack of ornamentation, and thoughtfully considered proportions became benchmarks for design that defined the façades of so many of its buildings. In general, Baltimoreans never really enjoyed being in the mainstream of style and rarely followed trends. In doing so, Baltimore preserved much of its original character, which so many other cities lost as they pursued architectural trends and fashion.”

Participating travelers will be visiting these sites, among others:
Mount Clare, built by Charles Carroll the Barrister, holds one of country’s finest privately owned decorative arts collections in the country (3,000 objects), most of which belonged to the Carroll family.

Homewood, recently restored, is considered by some the best Federal five-part country house on the East Coast. The details of its construction were fine enough to bankrupt the original owner. Our guided tour will be led by a curator and restoration architect.

Carroll Mansion (1811), where Charles Carroll of Carrollton died, the longest-living signer of the Declaration of Independence and the only Catholic. Architect John H.B. Latrobe, son of Benjamin Henry Latrobe, called it “the finest house in Baltimore at the time.”

In 2010, John G. Waite Associates, Architects, PLLC, won the Palladio Award for the restoration and renovation of the Basilica of the Assumption or Baltimore Cathedral. Architectural experts will guide us through this 35,000-sq. ft. Neoclassical building of radiant grandeur.

A walking tour of the historic heart of the city, Mount Vernon Place, will be led by architect Walter Schamu, founder of the Baltimore Architecture Foundation. The walk will include, among other sites, private visits to the George Peabody Library (1878), once part of America’s first cultural center with its five tiers of ornamental cast-iron balconies rising to a skylight and the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion (1884-1916), designed by Stanford White, doubled in size by John Russell Pope and restored by our tour leader’s firm, SMG Architects. Now the headquarters of the Engineering Society of Baltimore, we will have lunch in this former home of a society grande dame.

The Ladew Topiary Gardens and Manor House (1930s and c. 1747 with later additions) was created by Harvey S. Ladew on 22 of the 200-acre property in nearby Monkton and described as “the most outstanding topiary garden in America” by the Garden Club of America. With the assistance of architect James W. O’Connor and interior decorators Billy Baldwin, Jean Levy and Ruby Ross Wood, socialite Ladew converted the rustic farmhouse into a luxurious country house. The Duke and Duchess of Windsor were frequent guests (Wallis was an old friend). We will tour the house and gardens and stop here for lunch as well.

Reached by a magnificent Corinthian portico, Evergreen (c.1855) contains collections owned by the prominent Garrett family, a 1928 library lined with hand-carved walnut paneling and bookcases and a theater decorated by Bakst, the famed stage designer for the Russian ballet.

David Gleason will take us on a walking tour of the “Garden Suburb” Guilford, laid out by Frederick Law Olmstead, Jr., and opened in 1913. It possesses a wealth of early 20th-century traditional residential architecture. Here, we will also have a number of private visits, including a beautiful Georgian Revival home, with a carved pineapple above the front door to welcome us, and extensive formal and woodland gardens to visit as well. Acclaimed interior designer Mona Hajj has invited us to her home stunning home for dinner. Other elegant Guilford homes will be included.

The opening dinner and lecture on Wednesday evening, September 25, will be held at the Maryland Club (1891), restored and renovated by SMG Architects after a devastating fire in 1996. The 10-million-dollar project won a Baltimore Heritage Historic Preservation Award the following year. The building is an example of the American “free eclectic” style of H. H. Richardson and others, asymmetrical with harmonious proportions. Walter Schamu, principal of SMG Architects, will give us a tour.

Four nights of accommodations will be made available at the historic Wyndham Baltimore Peabody Court, which is close by Mount Vernon Place. The tour will end Sunday noon, September 29. For inquiries, contact Tom Hayes at Classical Excursions, tom@classicalexcursions.com or (413) 243-4155.

Due to the private nature of many of the tour sites, they are subject to change while others will be added.


Bernini's Rome: Drawing and Painting Tour

June 8-15, 2013

Join experienced instructors of the ICAA and affiliated institutions for this opportunity to experience Rome while honing your observational drawing and painting skills. Participants at all levels will be provided with a practical knowledge of the classical tradition as manifested in Rome and enjoy ample opportunity for the observation and representation of classical architecture. This signature study and drawing tour is open to all architects, artists, and like-minded individuals. This year’s tour will have a special focus on the life and work of Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

Credit hours from this trip may be counted toward the completion of the Certificate in Classical Architecture.

Watch the video from last year’s tour.

Application Deadline: March 1, 2013
Program Fee: $2,900 ($2,700 Members)

Includes cost of instruction, lecture fees, day trip fees, opening reception and closing dinner, museum entrance fees, and double accommodation. A limited number of single rooms are available for an additional supplement. Prices are subject to change due to currency exchange rates.

Continuing Education Hours: 40 (15 HSW) AIA/CES CEHs available.

For more information and to request an application, please email Ryan Greene or call 212.730.9646 × 116.

INSTRUCTOR BIOS

Richard Wilson Cameron
Richard Cameron was educated at the University of Toronto and Princeton University, and spent a year in Rome teaching for the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Studies Program.  In 1992 Richard co-founded the Institute of Classical Architecture (now the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art). Richard has taught drawing, design and the history of architectural theory at the Institute since its foundation, and served on the board of Directors, most recently as its Vice-Chairman.  Currently the Acting Director of Education of the ICAA, Mr. Cameron also serves as Director of the Beaux-Arts Atelier.  He was awarded first prize in the Royal Oak Foundation’s Annual Architecture Competition in 1993.  His work has appeared in House and Garden; The New York Times; Period Homes; New Old House; Traditional Building; and various other books and journals throughout his career.

Michael Djordjevitch
Michael Djordjevitch studied Architecture at the University of Toronto, receiving his B. Arch in 1979.  He then worked at the Royal Ontario Museum and taught at the School of Architecture of the University of Toronto, while taking courses in Art History.  His principal teacher was Prof. Hans Luecke.  In 1988 he was accepted into the History and Theory Program of the School of Architecture of Princeton University, receiving his Masters in 1991.  The following year he was received into the Graduate Program of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, completing the program and becoming a Fellow of the School in 1993.  Throughout the 90’s he worked as one of the two Architects for the Agora Excavations of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  In 2001 be began to teach for the Architecture Program of the University of Notre Dame in Rome.  Following the completion of his term in 2003, he was invited to the home campus as a visiting critic for the next several years. 

Patrick Connors
Patrick Connors is a 1980 graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Certificate Program. There, he studied primarily under Arthur DeCosta and was awarded the Perspective Prize. In 1982 he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. His work is exhibited internationally and in the past decade has been in solo or group venues at the National Academy of Design, New York Academy of Art, Butler Institute of American Art, Meredith Long & Company, Pierrepont Fine Arts, Arcadia Gallery, and Hirschl & Adler Galleries. His paintings, drawings, designs, and murals are included in private and public collections. In 2002, Connors was awarded an Oxford University Summer Residency Fellowship in painting and anatomy. In 1998 he was awarded a Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant for painting and in 1999 was the select alternate for a Senior Research Fulbright Scholarship for Italy. He teaches in the Graduate School of the New York Academy of Art, Grand Central Academy of Art, Institute of Classical Architecture, Studio Incamminati, and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Among the institutions at which he has lectured are Yale University Art Gallery, Water Street Atelier, Drexel School of Medicine, Classical America: Philadelphia Chapter, the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In fall 2009 he was a visiting artist at Savannah College of Art and Design.


Great Houses of Connecticut’s Fairfield County

June 5-9, 2013

Arranged by Classical Excursions

Fairfield County, Connecticut is a locale where “New York City meets New England charm.” As one of the highest-income regions in the nation, the county’s affluent suburban towns that are situated along the Connecticut seashore have been coined the Gold Coast. Located approximately one hour from Manhattan, this region’s reputation for wealth and fame has long existed. The towns include Greenwich, Darien, Southport, and Westport and New Canaan and Ridgefield are a short distance inland but also a must to see.

During this exclusive educational tour of the area, we will visit some of America’s finest classical architecture, interiors, and gardens as well as remarkable historical sites. We will also visit award-winning design firms, attend private functions, and have the opportunity to stay in appealing overnight accommodations. The itinerary will begin Wednesday evening, June 5, with an opening dinner and will end Sunday, June 9, at noon.

Tour Price: Land cost is $2495 per person. This includes a $500 donation per person to the Institute’s Annual Fund. A single supplement of $300 applies.

For inquiries, contact Tom Hayes at Classical Excursions, tom@classicalexcursions.com or (413) 243-4155.


Great Country Houses & Gardens of Northern Ireland & The Republic

May 25-June 1, 2013

Arranged by Classical Excursions

Inspired by the architecture of Inigo Jones, who was the first to establish the Palladian style in 17th century England, followed by Lord Burlington, William Kent, Colen Campbell, and other early 18th century English architects, Ireland at the same time developed its own dramatic Palladian movement starting with the new façade for the country house, Castletown, designed by Allessandro Galilei in 1719. He provided details that reflected Palladio’s villas in the Veneto, such as colonnaded connections that linked the main building to end pavilions.

The leading architect of Palladian country houses in Ireland was Sir Edward Lovett Pearce, who provided interior details at Castletown and the design for Bellamont Forest, c. 1730, among other work. He developed a style that combined baroque inventiveness, movement and boldness with the somberness of the English Palladian style. These and other outstanding Irish Palladian country houses will be viewed during this tour with the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.

Over the past several years a bright new political and economic era has been ushered into Northern Ireland and the glorious country houses of the province are an architecturally classical heritage to be discovered. This exclusive tour will include a stay at the privately owned Ballywalter, an Italianate Palazzo built in 1846 and now the family home of Lord Dunleath, along with a two-night stay at Belle Isle Castle, home of Lord Nicholas Hamilton. The tour concludes in the Republic of Ireland with a three night stay at a four star hotel located in the heart of Dublin.

This exclusive tour is led by Lani Summerville of Classical Excursions, who has organized four previous tours to Northern Ireland and the Republic.

TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

  • Mount Stewart, Newtownards, County Down: Originally built in 1804 and later extended, the first architect was George Dance, the teacher of Sir John Soane. Filled with magnificent antiques, the Regency-styled house contains 22 chairs used at the Congress of Vienna (1815) and given to Mt. Stewart’s owner, Lord Castlereagh, British Foreign Secretary and member of the Londonderry family. Mt. Stewart’s gardens cover 80 acres and are considered the most complete in Ireland, thriving in the area’s subtropical microclimate. Overlooking Strangford Lough is the exquisite small banqueting pavilion inspired by the Temple of the Winds in Athens.
  • Florence Court, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh: An important Irish Georgian mansion, it was named after Lady Florence Cole, the wife of Sir John Cole, the owner who had built around 1730 the finally proportioned center block of the house. A later generation in the 1760s added flanking arcaded wings with end pavilions. The vigorous treatment of the exterior is repeated in the interior. Lavish Rococo plaster decoration is featured which was painstakingly restored after a fire in 1955. The Venetian Room, staircase and dining room have the most elaborate plasterwork. The house is filled with 18th-century Irish furniture.
  • Castle Coole, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh: Considered the finest Neo-classical country house in Ireland, it nearly bankrupted its owner, Armar Lowry-Corry, Earl of Belmore, in his attempt in the 1790s to outdo his brother-in-law and neighbor, the Earl of Enniskillen, at Florence Court. The quality of the Portland stone masonry is exceptional, with the design on all four sides of equal perfection. It continues inside, with harmonious unity and balance in the joinery and plasterwork. The final plans were executed by the English architect, James Wyatt. The plasterer was Joseph Rose, who had been hired by Robert Adam to work at Syon House and Harewood House.in England. Another glory of Castle Coole is that almost all of the Regency furniture is original and still in place.
  • A two-night stay at the privately owned Ballywalter Park, hosted by Lord Dunleath. Built in 1846 for Andrew Mullholland (whose son became the first Lord Dunleath) and designed by the prominent Belfast architect, Sir Charles Lanyon, the house is the best-preserved example of the Italianate palazzo style in Ireland.
  • A private visit and tea at Barons Court, hosted by His Grace, Duke of Abercorn. The house was started in 1779 by the architect George Steuart (who also designed Attingham Hall in Shropshire 1783). Later architects involved in redesigning and completing Barons Court were John Soane and Richard and William Morrison. The result was a powerful seven-bay house with a rotunda located in the heart of the building. The main pediment contains the family coat of arms. The interiors range from the classical coffered rotunda encircled by a ring of Ionic columns to a typical Morrisonian library redecorated by the prominent English decorator, David Hicks.
  • A two-night stay at Belle Isle Castle, built in the 16th century and currently owned by the Duke of Abercorn for his son Lord Nicholas Hamilton to reside in.
  • A visit to Castletown in County Kildare, Irelands first Palladian house to be erected with proper classical proportions and designed by a professional architect, Alessandro Galiliei (1691-1737). This house is said to have inspired the White House.
  • A tour of the incredible Palladian jewel Russborough House. Built in 1741 by Joseph Leeson. “No other Palladian house in Ireland equals it either for its architecture or its spectacular setting”.
  • Dinner at Leixlip Castle, the home of Desmond Guinness, founder of the Irish Georgian Society and major leader of restoration in Ireland. Leixlip is one of the original 12th century Pale Towers (defense fortresses surrounding Dublin and contains a fabulous print room.
  • A rare visit to the Marsh library founded in 1701 as Irelands first public library. One of the few early 18th century buildings in Ireland still preserved and used for its original purpose, the library contains over 25,000 books from the 16th—18th centuries.
  • A tour of the rarely seen Provosts House, owned by Trinity College. This grand mid-18th century town house is the only 18th century mansion in the Republic of Ireland that still retains is original function and form.
  • A visit to the privately owned 18th century Lodge Park, the home of Robert Guinness. Known both for its grand architecture and amazing 18th century gardens.
  • Marino Casino, the pleasure pavilion designed by Sir William Chambers and considered to be one of the most perfect buildings in Europe.
  • A tour of the newly created Titanic Exhibit in Belfast, located in the historic Harland & Wolff shipyards, where the Titanic was built.
  • A three-night stay at a four-star hotel in central Dublin.

Tour Price: $4995.00 per person, based on double occupancy. Tour price includes a $500 tax-deductible donation to ICAA. A single supplement of $750.00 per person applies. The tour is limited to a small number of participants. Early registration is therefore suggested. Please contact Lani Summerville of Classical Excursions to register at lani@classicalexcursions.com or (413) 551-7331.


Private New York

December 6-9, 2012

TOUR IS SOLD OUT

As the fifth in the bi-annual series of Private New York tours sponsored by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, we continue to discover the great metropolis’s cutting edge leadership in the latest developments in architecture and interior design created by some of the nation’s leading talent past and present.

As in past years, we will be given entrée to some of the finest townhouses and apartments, including one on Fifth Avenue (a McKim, Mead and White building) that revels in great collections of fine and decorative arts and well-conceived décor. A second is stylishly grand and filled with 18th century French antiques also on Fifth Avenue. A third is at 84th Street and Fifth Avenue. Near Park Avenue is a beautiful Georgian New York townhouse (Delano and Aldrich) belonging to Richard H. Jenrette, the connoisseur and collector of the best historic houses and museum-quality interiors. Nearby is another Delano & Aldrich mansion, now The Synod of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia.

Top coast-to-coast interior designer Suzanne Rheinstein and her husband, Fred, will welcome us into their serene, yet glamorous, pied-à-terre which she has decorated. Also on view will be a former townhouse that is currently the headquarters of the private New York Society Library. One special site will be the former townhouse of legendary architect/interior designer Ogden Codman, Jr., co-author with Edith Wharton of The Decoration of Houses. Another site includes a 19th century townhouse in Greenwich Village decorated and renovated by Fairfax & Sammons Architects.

The first evening is reserved for an opening dinner and lecture at the New York Yacht Club, designed by Warren & Wetmore. Distinguished architectural historian Francis Morrone will discuss the architecture and decoration of the New York Public Library, a Beaux-Arts masterpiece. During the following full day of touring, Francis will take us on a private architectural tour of the library. Designed by Carrère and Hastings and completed in 1911, the “people’s palace” is considered one of America’s greatest classical public buildings. Mr. Morrone is the co-author with Henry Hope Reed of The New York Public Library: The Architecture and Decoration of the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building.

In addition, we will be hosted at several of New York City’s private clubs for tours and meals. On the evening of December 7, we will be guests of the Institute’s first annual Stanford White Awards presented at the Racquet & Tennis Club on Park Avenue.

Please note that due to the private nature of most of the tour sites described, they are subject to change while others will be added.

This tour is sold out. For questions, please contact Tom Hayes of Classical Excursions at (413) 243-4155 or tom@classicalexcursions.com.


Santa Barbara, Montecito & California Mediterranean

October 17-21, 2012

Tour Arranged by Classical Excursions

TOUR IS SOLD OUT

“California Mediterranean,” states architect and tour leader Gabriel Zamora, “is an in-depth excursion of the architecture of Santa Barbara and Montecito, featuring works by such architects as George Washington Smith, Reginald Johnson, Lutah Maria Riggs, and Francis Wilson, along with the work of leading architects of today, including Marc Appleton and John Saladino. Focusing on Santa Barbara’s early-to-mid 20th century development, as well as more recent work, California Mediterranean offers visitors a rare understanding of what the world has come to know as the Southern California style.

“From the colonial past up to the present day architects in the Santa Barbara area have developed a regional style that celebrates Southern California’s unique coastal geography, emphasizing simple, bold forms, indoor-outdoor living, and a gracious scale that blends the demands of comfort and retreat with the climate-induced opportunities to see and be seen.”

In 1925 a major earthquake leveled Santa Barbara and with great foresight local historic preservationists and civic planners had the city transformed into a consistent Spanish Revival style. This was a period when American classicism in architecture was at its height.

Since the late 19th century, Santa Barbara has remained a popular destination for the rich and famous, giving it the nickname, The American Riviera. Although a smaller community, elegant and secluded Montecito has also attracted the affluent, including members of the entertainment world.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, in conjunction with its Southern and Northern California chapters, is pleased to sponsor this tour led by Gabriel Zamora, an architect with Appleton & Associates, Inc. At the opening lecture, Gabriel, an architectural historian, will give an overview of the tour sites, among which will be the private houses and accompanying gardens of Villa di Lemma (John Saladino), El Cielito and Casa Del Herrero (George Washington Smith), Villa Corbeau (Marc Appleton), La Solana (Francis T. Underhill), Miraflores and El Eliseo (Reginald Johnson). Also scheduled is a visit to the extraordinary Lotusland and an architectural tour of Santa Barbara’s celebrated city center.

Experts and specialists will be on hand to share their knowledge and select homeowners will host private functions, including Mr. & Mrs. Marc Appleton at their home, Villa Corbeau. Accommodations for four nights will be at the historic Upham Hotel with its tranquil gardens – an elegant city landmark established in 1871 as the oldest continuously operating hostelry in Southern California.

SELECTED HIGHLIGHTS

The Johnson House, Sotto il Monte, was completed by George Washington Smith in 1928. The Johnson family was especially inspired by the architecture of the Roman and Tuscan campagna, and Smith responded with a design that weaves a distinctly Italian thread into the California Mediterranean tapestry. Whether ornamental or practical, the house’s exterior details are directly inspired by traditional Italian methods. The gardens, designed by A.E. Hanson, complement the formality of the architecture, yet the house and its grounds are carefully integrated with one another in typical Smith fashion. The restrained interiors are also typical Smith, but the refinement of surface and detail reflect a more urbane character than usually associated with colonial revival architecture. The main stair, typical in this regard, is sparsely decorated while the delicacy of its curvature and the precision of its stone cladding are more than sufficiently ornamental.

The Gavit House, now known as Lotusland, has accumulated a variety of appellations since its completion in 1920. The architecture was originally designed by Reginald Johnson and subsequently altered and added to by George Washington Smith for later generations of the Gavit family. This iterative construction process, sometimes involving a single architect, sometimes involving several, is a distinct characteristic of the building culture in Santa Barbara and Montecito and speaks to the architectural synergy of the early 20th century Santa Barbara School. Likewise, the gardens have been turned by several design hands including Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest. Johnson’s original design featured spare surfaces and eclectic volumes punctuated by Spanish Baroque ornament. Smith’s work expanded the house’s plan and gave its ornament a North-African inflection in keeping with the house’s established Spanish character.

Reginald Johnson was commissioned to design El Eliseo for the Lowe family in 1920. Johnson was a maturing architect at the time and private commissions like El Eliseo and Miraflores were expanding his practice from the San Gabriel region into Santa Barbara. El Eliseo expresses its owner’s affection for Italy’s alpine region through its carved stone detailing, the vertical massing of its interior garden side, and its elevated second-story loggia that looks over Montecito’s gentle descent to the Pacific. The paneled interiors, some stained & some painted, suited the cultural traditions of both the owners and their architect, but also complemented the Mediterranean character of the house and the owner’s particular taste for classical Italian art.

El Cielito ~ George Washington Smith began the house known as El Cielito in 1920 for friend and fellow painter De Witt Parshall, and continued work on the structure into 1924 for the original owner’s son Douglas. El Cielito exhibits an artist’s attention to detail, arrangement, and light. Here Smith’s disciplined palette of regional materials and forms is punctuated by subtle manipulations of building mass, gentle level changes, and ornamental furnishings that are deployed with utmost economy and effectiveness. Natural daylight enters at various angles throughout the house, animating the design and imparting a dynamic character to the interiors. Smith’s weaving of the house into its surrounding landscape is exemplary for making the gardens an interior feature of the house and for celebrating the connection between architecture and landscape with formal and spatial elements.

Casa Del Herrero was begun in 1922 for George F. Steedman, a metallurgist who endowed the Steedman Architectural Library in the St. Louis Public Library and the Steedman Travelling Fellowship in Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis. Steedman’s intimate involvement in the design and construction of his house is reflected in the ornamental centaur figure that Smith employed throughout the residence. The house opened on the day of the Santa Barbara earthquake, June 28, 1925, and maintained its structural integrity. Casa del Herrero is influenced by Smith’s travels to Spain, Italy, and Mexico and by Steedman’s own affection for the Mediterranean architecture of Spain and France. The design incorporates the ornamental connoisseurship of Arthur Byne and Mildred Stapley, well known for outfitting Hearst Castle at San Simeon, and the landscape design of Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest. The library tower is a tour-de-force of architectural ornament wrought by a young Lutah Maria Riggs, who was an advanced draftsperson in Smith’s office during the design of the Casa.

Miraflores ~ In 1919 the Jefferson family took possession of the house called Miraflores, transformed for them by Reginald Johnson out of the derelict shell of Francis Wilson’s Montecito Country Club, which burned in 1912. Johnson re-worked the original club-house structure that had presided over Montecito’s (then) nine-hole golf course and fashioned it into a private residence with a domestic scale that is nestled into a verdant hilltop landscape designed by Paul Thiene. The house’s restrained architecture is characteristic of Johnson’s larger body of work, but also exemplifies a more classically-inflected instance of California’s Mediterranean architecture. One of Johnson’s greatest accomplishments at Miraflores is the seamless domesticity that he drew out of the original club-house plan and the way indoor and outdoor rooms are truly habitable without any resort to architectural gimmick. Color, detail, ornament, material, and view are orchestrated to resonate with the poetry evoked by the house’s namesake. In 1920 Reginald Johnson became the first California architect to receive the AIA National Award for Architecture, for the design of Miraflores.

Highlights are only a partial listing.

TOUR PRICE: Land cost is $2250.00 per person with a $300.00 per person single supplement. A $500 tax-deductible donation to ICAA is included in the price. ICAA members at the Contributor or Sole Practitioner level or higher may attend tours.

This tour is currently sold out. Please contact lani@classicalexcursions.com with questions.


Private Palaces, Villas & Gardens of Venice and the Veneto

October 7-14, 2012

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling, Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs

Venice and the Veneto’s rich cultural heritage are unique in the world. This exclusive program will take an intimate group of discerning travelers beyond the usual tourist sites to view the secret Venice and Veneto, known only to Venetian nobility and the privileged few. For seven days we will view the most important Palladian villas and palazzi to observe the development of Venetian art, décor, and architecture, guided by our expert lecturer, Countess Giuliana di Thiene. We will enjoy private visits, lunches, cocktail receptions, and dinners in magnificent private villas and palazzi—rarely opened to the public—owned by Venetian nobility and esteemed members of the cultural and social worlds.

Our journey begins in Asolo, a picturesque medieval town whose gentle hills and stunning views inspired Titian and Giorgione. We will stay at the 4-star deluxe hotel Villa Cipriani. Once the home of poet Robert Browning, this luxurious, relaxing haven is perched above Asolo and surrounded by stunning gardens and spectacular views.

Our last four nights will be spent at the newly renovated, 4-star luxury Starhotels Splendid Venice, near Piazza San Marco, offering comfortable rooms decorated in elegant Venetian style with marble bathrooms. Overlooking the sparkling facades of century-old palazzi, the hotel offers spacious lounge areas, a handsome courtyard dining room, and a roof-terrace with spectacular views of Venice.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

Tour Price: $7,500 per person double occupancy; single-occupancy guests may choose between: (1) $1,000 single supplement with Villa Cipriani & Starhotels Splendid Venice; or (2) $700 single supplement with 3-star Hotel Duse & Starhotels Splendid Venice. Based on an exchange rate of $1.35/1 Euro; minimum 15 participants (maximum 20 participants). A fully tax-deductible $500 donation to ICAA is also required.

Rate includes 7 days of private visits and receptions; 7 nights of hotel accommodations; 3 nights at the 4-star luxury hotel Villa Cipriani, Deluxe Rooms double occupancy; Superior Rooms single occupancy (or 3-star Hotel Duse: single occupancy) in Asolo; and 4 nights at the 4-star luxury boutique Starhotels Splendid Venice, Superior Rooms; 7 breakfasts; 7 luncheons, cocktail receptions, and 5 dinners; transportation to and from events; all private visits and expert lecturer.

To assure availability, please reserve now. Reservations are confirmed according to registration date. Confirmed participants will receive a full itinerary and description. Members at the Contributor or Sole Practitioner level or higher are welcome to attend ICAA tours. For more information and to reserve, please call Pamela Huntington Darling: Tel. (Paris, France) +33 1 45 67 62 81; or email: pdarling@exclusiveculturaltours.com.


“Private Paris & Surroundings”: Exemplary Architecture, Decorative Arts, Residences, Chateaux & Gardens during the “Biennale des Antiquaires”

September 8-15, 2012

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling of Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs

CLICK HERE FOR A LIST OF TOUR HIGHLIGHTS


Back by popular demand, ICAA’s “Private Paris & Beyond” tour offers unrivaled access to the finest classical architecture, decorative arts, and gardens in Paris, including exclusive visits and receptions with prominent officials, private individuals, and acclaimed experts. This year’s tour coincides with the world-renowned 26th Biennale des Antiquaires.

For seven extraordinary days, “Private Paris & Beyond” takes a behind-the-scenes look at Paris’s outstanding classical architecture, including sites by François Mansart, Louis Le Vau, Antoine Lepautre, Jules Hardouin Mansart, Ange-Jacques Gabriel, and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux. Expert-led tours provide exclusive access to ambassadorial residences, renowned French institutions, private homes and châteaux of distinction, where we will view exquisite décors, rare art collections and extensive gardens and enjoy private receptions, music, and dinners.

We will also make a special visit to the world-class 26th Biennale des Antiquaires —decorated by Karl Lagerfeld—to view museum quality art and artifacts dating from ancient times to the present.

We will stay in elegant Saint-Germain-des-Près at the Hotel Saint Vincent, 5 rue du Pré aux Clercs, www.hotelsdufaubourgsaintgermain.com. or the Hotel Duc de Saint Simon, 14 rue Saint-Simon; www.hotelducdesaintsimon.com. Rooms are beautifully furnished with marble bathrooms and gracious service.

Tour Price: $7,000 per person double occupancy; $1,000 single supplement; based on an exchange rate of $1.35/1 Euro; with a maximum of 22 participants (minimum 15); plus a fully tax-deductible $500 donation to ICAA. Members at the Contributor or Sole Practitioner level or higher may attend the ICAA tours.

Rate includes 7 days of private visits and receptions; 7 nights accommodation in a 3-star, elegant boutique hotel; all breakfasts, 5 lunches, cocktail receptions, and 4 dinners in private residences; all costs involved in the program, transport to and from events during the tour, all private visits, expert lecturers, etc.

For more information and to assure availability, please reserve now. Reservations are confirmed according to registration date. Confirmed participants will receive a full itinerary and description. Please call Pamela Huntington Darling: Tel. (Paris, France) +33 1 45 67 62 81; or email: pdarling@exclusiveculturaltours.com.





Discovering the Treasures of Bordeaux: Exemplary 17th to 21st Century Architecture, Decorative Arts, Châteaux & Gardens

June 17 – 23, 2012

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling, Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs

A connoisseur’s journey, with exclusive access to private homes and properties

The City of Bordeaux, Port of the Moon, is described by UNESCO World Heritage as “an inhabited historic city, an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble, created in the Age of Enlightenment, whose values continued up to the first half of the 20th century.”

The Bordeaux region, a place of exchange and commerce for over 2,000 years, thanks in part to its production of its fine wine, has, after Paris, more edifices on the national list of Historic Monuments than any other city in France, priding majestic Neo-Classical buildings, several of which influenced Classical architecture in the United States, such as the James B Duke House, now NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts, listed on the U.S. National Register of Historical Buildings, modeled after Hôtel Labottière, or the great Ogden Codman house in New York, inspired by several houses he had admired in Bordeaux.

The creation of Bordeaux’ unique ensemble of 18th century public buildings, residences, streets and squares, considered purer and more perfect than many examples in Paris, is a tribute to the philosophers of the French Enlightenment who influenced by their beliefs the city’s planning: to produce admirable buildings—theatres, town halls, other official sites, and private mansions—in an imposing planned setting—with squares, parks, walks, fountains and inspiring perspectives.

By the middle of the 18th century, ancient Greece and Andrea Palladio became the principal references to the new “Neo-Classical style”. 20th and 21st century architects have continued in this honorable tradition designing remarkable buildings in Bordeaux and its wine region.

During our exclusive architectural and decorative arts program, lead by our expert lecturer, we will visit the most significant examples of classical architecture of the 18th century, majestic buildings and town houses in the historic center of Bordeaux, and be received by prominent officials.

We will also enjoy privileged visits, luncheons or dinners with our hosts at Bordeaux’s most significant chateaux celebrated for their architecture—ancient and contemporary—and for their fine wine, such as: Chateau Cheval Blanc, featuring a wine cellar created by architect Christian de Portzamparc; Chateau Saint-Georges, designed by Victor Louis, classical architect of the exemplary 18th century Grand Theatre of Bordeaux; Chateau Lafite Rothschild, whose circular wine cellar with Neo-Classic pillars was designed by architect Ricardo Bofill; Chateau La Mission Haut Brion, including a cloister, a 17th chapel, and a remarkable garden; and Château Margaux, celebrating pure Palladian style, interior decor recently renovated by French classical architect Francois-Joseph Graf.

We will reside at the 5-star luxury Grand Hotel de Bordeaux & Spa, a French Historic Monument, member of the “Leading Hotels of the World”. Situated on a superb square, the hotel, part of the late 18th century development of the city center, was designed by classical architect Victor Louis, also responsible for the Grand Theatre, located on the opposite side of the square. The recent restoration was achieved respecting the rich historic past of the building. The sophisticated interior decoration, recently renovated by famed decorator Jacques Garcia, was inspired by classical French tradition.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and Pamela Huntington Darling, specializing in organizing inimitable cultural travel programs, welcome you to join us for this exclusive cultural program.

Click here for complete tour highlights

Tour Price: Land cost based on double occupancy: $6,000 per person; single supplement: $750; based on an exchange rate of $1.35/1 Euro; a minimum of 15 participants (maximum 20 participants); plus a $500 fully tax-deductible donation to the Institute.

Rate includes: 6 days of private visits and receptions; 6 nights of hotel accommodations at the 5-star luxury Grand Hotel de Bordeaux & Spa; 6 breakfasts; 4 luncheons and 4 dinners; transportation to and from events; all private visits, and expert lecturers.

To assure availability, please reserve now. Confirmation will be treated according to date of your registration.

For more information or to register, please call +33 1 45 67 62 81 or email: pdarling@exclusiveculturaltours.com.

Members at the Contributor or Sole Practitioner level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

Second Image: Place de la Bourse, Jean-Bernard Nadeau, photographer


Rome Through the Eyes of Piranesi: Drawing and Painting Tour

June 9–16, 2012

Join experienced instructors of the ICAA and affiliated institutions for this opportunity to experience Rome while honing your observational drawing and painting skills. Participants at all levels will be provided with a practical knowledge of the classical tradition as manifested in Rome, and ample opportunity for the observation and representation of classical architecture. This signature study and drawing tour is open to all architects, artists, and like-minded individuals. Credit hours from this trip may be counted toward the completion of the Certificate in Classical Architecture.

Watch the video from last year’s tour.

Application Deadline: March 1, 2012.
Program Fee: $2,400 ($2,150 Members).
Includes cost of instruction, lecture fees, day trip fees, opening reception and closing dinner, museum entrance fees, and double accommodation. A limited number of single rooms are available for an additional supplement. Prices are subject to change due to currency exchange rates.
Continuing Education Hours: 40 (15 HSW) AIA/CES CEHs available.

For more information, please email us at education@classicist.org, or call 212.730.9646 × 116

INSTRUCTOR BIOS

Richard Wilson Cameron
Richard Cameron was educated at the University of Toronto and Princeton.  He also spent a year in Rome teaching for the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Studies Program.  In 1992 Richard co-founded the Institute of Classical Architecture (now the Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America). Richard has taught drawing and the history of architectural theory at the Institute since its foundation, and currently serves on the board of Directors as its Vice-Chairman.  He is also the Chairman of the Institute’s Education Committee.  He was awarded first prize in the Royal Oak Foundation’s Annual Architecture Competition in 1993.  His work has appeared in House and Garden; The New York Times; Period Homes; New Old House; Traditional Building; and various other books and journals throughout his career.  

Michael Djordjevitch
Michael Djordjevitch studied Architecture at the University of Toronto, receiving his B. Arch in 1979.  He then worked at the Royal Ontario Museum and taught at the School of Architecture of the University of Toronto, while taking courses in Art History.  His principal teacher was Prof. Hans Luecke.  In 1988 he was accepted into the History and Theory Program of the School of Architecture of Princeton University, receiving his Masters in 1991.  The following year he was received into the Graduate Program of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, completing the program and becoming a Fellow of the School in 1993.  Throughout the 90’s he worked as one of the two Architects for the Agora Excavations of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  In 2001 be began to teach for the Architecture Program of the University of Notre Dame in Rome.  Following the completion of his term in 2003, he was invited to the home campus as a visiting critic for the next several years. 

Patrick Connors
Patrick Connors is a 1980 graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Certificate Program. There, he studied primarily under Arthur DeCosta and was awarded the Perspective Prize. In 1982 he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. His work is exhibited internationally and in the past decade has been in solo or group venues at the National Academy of Design, New York Academy of Art, Butler Institute of American Art, Meredith Long & Company, Pierrepont Fine Arts, Arcadia Gallery, and Hirschl & Adler Galleries. His paintings, drawings, designs, and murals are included in private and public collections. In 2002, Connors was awarded an Oxford University Summer Residency Fellowship in painting and anatomy. In 1998 he was awarded a Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant for painting and in 1999 was the select alternate for a Senior Research Fulbright Scholarship for Italy. He teaches in the Graduate School of the New York Academy of Art, Grand Central Academy of Art, Institute of Classical Architecture, Studio Incamminati, and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Among the institutions at which he has lectured are Yale University Art Gallery, Water Street Atelier, Drexel School of Medicine, Classical America: Philadelphia Chapter, the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In fall 2009 he was a visiting artist at Savannah College of Art and Design.

Image: Temple of Castor and Pollux, 2011 by Patrick Connors


Norfolk, Yorkshire & Scotland: Country Houses of Sir Edwin Lutyens & Sir Robert Lorimer

May 17 – 25, 2012

Arranged by Classical Excursions

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art in collaboration with Classical Excursions has arranged an exclusive eight-day tour with special access to country residences by Lutyens (Gledstone Hall, Heathcote, Lindisfarne Castle, Grey Walls among them) and Lorimer (Ardkinglas Estate, Kellie Castle, Hill of Tarvit Mansionhouse among others), some privately owned and normally not open to the public. The excursion will also offer lectures by scholars and specialists. Accommodations will include charming rural inns and hotels, and meals in equally atmospheric country restaurants.

Architectural historian and Lutyens tour leader extraordinaire Paul Waite has arranged for us to see a glorious array of private country houses by Lutyens, and will also introduce us to the architectural treasures of Scottish architect Sir Robert Lorimer, who is known as “the Lutyens of Scotland”.

Lutyens (1869 – 1944) is considered one of England’s greatest and most prolific architects with more than 600 commissions in Great Britain, Europe, South Africa, India, and the United States. Beginning at the age of nineteen with little formal education or architectural training, his career lasted more than half a century, from the time of Queen Victoria to World War II.

Sir Robert Lorimer (1846-1929) began his architectural career in the office of Scottish Revivalist architect Robert Rowand Anderson and in 1893 formed his own practice. By this time Lorimer had developed an enthusiasm for the Arts and Crafts Movement, becoming committed to the unity of art and nature in architecture, and delighting in materials and the richness of textiles and color.

With the decline in popularity of the Arts and Crafts Movement around 1900, Lorimer turned his attention to several large-scale country-house commissions, mainly designed in the Scots Baronial style. The outbreak of World War I restricted the demand for large new houses and his attention shifted to restoration projects, an area of expertise for which he had gained a reputation, and to significant public works.

SELECTED TOUR HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE


Houses by Sir Edwin Lutyens

  • Overstrand Hall
  • The Pleasance
  • Gledstone Hall
  • Heathcote
  • Sion Hill
  • Lindisfarne Castle
  • Whalton Manor
  • Grey Walls

Houses Designed or Restored by Sir Robert Lorimer

  • Lennoxlove House
  • Kellie Castle
  • Hill of Tarvit Mansionhouse
  • Marchmont Estate
  • Ardkinglas Estate

Click here for complete tour highlights

Tour Price: Land cost is $4,250 per person based on double occupancy. A single supplement of $600 applies.

For further information please contact Tom Hayes at Classical Excursions at tom@classicalexcursions.com or call (413) 243-4155.

Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

In addition, participants are required to make a contribution to the Institute’s Annual Fund —which help to further our mission of advancing the practice and appreciation of the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. This contribution is fully tax-deductible.


Private Boston: Beacon Hill, Back Bay and Beyond

November 30 – December 4, 2011

Tour Arranged by Classical Excursions

Of all the cities in America, Boston architecturally has been known to remind travelers of London. The most important city in the 13 British colonies, Boston flourished, not only as the place where the ideas for independence were born, but also as America’s center for foreign commerce and dry goods as it grew in wealth during the 19th century.

Boston also earned a reputation as the intellectual capitol of the nation, naming it the Athens of America, with the opening of some of the nation’s earliest museums and libraries, a symphony orchestra, and the home of such eminent citizens as Emerson, Thoreau, Longfellow, Lowell, James, and Holmes. Mark Twain once commented, “In New York they ask what a man is worth. In Boston they ask, “What does he know?”

With Boston’s decades of increasing wealth came a panorama of fabulous architecture, much of which survives. One of the joys of the city is that it is compact…and accessible. The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and its affiliated New England Chapter invite you to experience the intimacy and beauty, for instance, of historic Beacon Hill, where some of America’s best examples of Federal architecture exist, dating from as early as the 1790s. Charles Bulfinch, Boston’s most prominent architect at the time, designed many of the homes, as well as the nearby Massachusetts State House. Other architects for the developing area were Asher Benjamin and Alexander Parris.

There will be tours of private homes throughout Beacon Hill, which is a designated National Historic District. The indelible impression will be one of elegance and the picturesque, not only Federal architecture, but also Greek Revival and later styles — an 1837 Greek Revival mansion where Henry James and Mark Twain were entertained and now exquisitely furnished with period interiors, an 1820s house beautifully decorated including scenic Zuber wallpaper in the front parlor, a decorator’s studio filled with splendid architectural objets, a stunning Harrison Gray Otis house in the Federal style (he built three), a spectacular Federal mansion overlooking one of the squares, an 1899 Georgian Revival mansion professionally decorated by its owner, and much more. We will have dinner one night at the exclusive Somerset Club on Beacon Street, a former mansion designed by Alexander Parris, where the membership has included Cabots, Lowells, and Lodges.

Based on French urban design with broad and sweeping boulevards, Back Bay, another highlight of the tour, was developed from the 1850s into one of Boston’s most exclusive neighborhoods. Commonwealth Avenue, the district’s main artery, was envisioned as the city’s Champs-Elysees, divided by a central linear park and lined with magnificent mansions and town houses. Despite many style variations, from Second French Empire, Ruskin Gothic, Romanesque Revival developed by H.H. Richardson, to English and American Georgian among the Revivals, Back Bay established restrictions that specified a general unity of height, setbacks, and masonry construction, creating a continuous street façade.

Here, more doors of private residences will be opened to us, including a magnificent French Beaux Arts mansion and an apartment decorated by a famed Boston interior designer. A very special visit will be an exclusive tour with the architect and fine art conservator who headed the restoration of John Singer Sargent’s magnificent murals at the Boston Public Library by Charles McKim.

We would be remiss not to include on the Private Boston tour such outlying residential areas as Brookline where the owner of a grand Colonial Revival house will host a private dinner; Lincoln to visit the Codman House, refurbished by a famed architect son, Ogden Codman, Jr., and Waltham where we will find Gore Place, one of New England’s finest Federal country houses and the spectacular Stonehurst mansion by H.H. Richardson.

The excursion will begin Wednesday evening, November 30, when we will be guests at the Second Annual Bulfinch Awards, a program recognizing excellence in New England Classical and Traditional Design and presented at the splendid Massachusetts State House.

We have arranged for first-rate accommodations for four nights at the newly refurbished Omni Parker House, located near Beacon Hill. The hotel has been named one of the top 10 Historic Hotels in America by the American Automobile Association. Opened in 1855, it is the birthplace of the Boston Cream Pie and Parker House Rolls, both of which are still served. JFK proposed to Jackie here, and Charles Dickens gave his first reading of A Christmas Carol. In addition, we will be transported throughout our stay by private motor coach.

Tour Price: Land cost is $2,395 per person based on double occupancy. A single supplement of $300 applies. A tax-deductible $500 donation to the Institute is included in the tour price.

AIA LUs available.

For further information, contact Classical Excursions, at (413) 528-3359 or lani@classicalexcursions.com.


Discovering the Treasures of Lebanon and Jordan & Exemplary Private Residences

Thursday, October 27—Tuesday, November 8, 2011

CLICK HERE FOR A LIST OF TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art is pleased to announce its first, unprecedented, private tour to Lebanon and Jordan, renowned for their unparalleled heritage, culture and warm hospitality, priding more spectacular UNESCO World Heritage and archeological sites than many countries. During twelve extraordinary, inspirational days and evenings, our exclusive program, organized by Pamela Hunting Darling, will offer participants expert-guided visits, conducted by internationally renowned archeologists, historians, and architects, to legendary, unrivaled sites, some inaccessible to the public, erected during the Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Nabatean, Umayyad, Crusader, and Ottoman periods, superbly preserved, as well as momentous sites of 18th to 21st century architecture.

We will also be the privileged guests of distinguished international hosts—Ambassadors, Statesmen, members of the Royal Family of Jordan, private collectors, renowned architects, artists, and interior designers—for luncheons, cocktail receptions and dinners in outstanding private residences and palaces—not open to the public—housing the highest level of architecture, décor, and rare and extensive collections of art.

This once-in-a-lifetime journey will commence in Beirut, Lebanon, acclaimed the “Paris of the East”, for 5 extraordinary days and 5 nights. We will then fly to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, consideredone of the pivotal centers of the Middle East for its heritage, culture and international development, for 7 glorious days and 7 nights.

We will reside in 5-star luxury hotels, offering all the amenities of 5-star European luxury hotels: pure luxury, relaxation, and splendid décor, surroundings and views, spas, fine cuisine, hospitality to perfection, and high-speed Internet and Wi-Fi access. We will stay at Hotel Le Gray in Beirut, the Four Seasons Hotel & Spa in Amman, Kempinski Hotel Ishtar & Spa at the Dead Sea, Mövenpick Resort in Petra, and Kempinski Hotel & Spa in Aqaba.

Tour price: (1) Full tour of Lebanon & Jordan: 12 days/12 nights: $9,000 per person double occupancy; $1,500 single supplement. (2) Lebanon only: 5 days/5 nights: $4,000 per person double occupancy; $900 single supplement. (3) Jordan only: 7 days/7 nights: $6,000 per person double occupancy; $750 single supplement. Prices are based on 12 participants minimum (20 maximum); and a fully tax-deductible $500 donation to ICAA.

For more information and to reserve, please call or e-mail Pamela Huntington Darling at: Tel. +33 1 45 67 62 81 (Paris);
E-mail: pdarling@exclusiveculturaltours.com. Please be sure to include your daytime and evening phone number in any and all correspondences.

Confirmation of reservation will be treated according to reception date of registration.

Due to the exceptional character of certain private visits and receptions proposed in this program, to which access is highly exclusive, if a venue is cancelled by the host, it will be replaced by a visit or reception of equal quality, and guests will be notified.

To assure availability, please reserve now. Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.


Private Palaces, Villas, and Gardens of Venice and the Veneto

Sunday, October 9–Sunday, October 16, 2011

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling, Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs

Click here to view a list of daily highlights.


Fascinating Venice and Veneto, priding a rich heritage of art, architecture, and décor, are ultimately unique. Beyond the usual tourist ventures, there is a secret Venice and Veneto, known to Venetians of nobility and the privileged few.

As a participant of this exclusive program, you will have the opportunity to join an intimate group of discerning travelers and be invited by members of the esteemed cultural and social world of the Veneto and Venice to private visits, luncheons, cocktail receptions, and dinners in magnificent villas and palazzi of Venetian nobility, rarely opened to outside visitors, accompanied by a historian of the Venetian community.

Following the 500th anniversary of the birth of the great Italian classical architect Andrea Palladio , we will enjoy seven days of private visits and receptions in the most important Palladian villas in the Veneto and in palazzi in Venice, with their proprietors, specially organized for you.

We will observe the development of Venetian art, décor and architecture through its beginnings to the emergence of the Renaissance and the peak of Venetian heritage in the 16th and the 18th centuries.

Countess Giuliana di Thiene, expert lecturer and member of Venetian nobility, will guide us throughout this unique cultural travel program to the Veneto region and to Venice.

For the first three nights, we will stay in the picturesque, medieval town of Asolo, “city of a thousand landscapes,” set on gentle hills that inspired Titian and Giorgione, offering stunning views of the countryside. We will reside at the 4-star luxury hotel Villa Cipriani, originally built during the Palladian period, once home to the famous poet Robert Browning, perched above Asolo, surrounded by stunning gardens, offering a peaceful setting with spectacular views and warm hospitality, providing access to the villas of the Veneto region.

For the remaining four nights in Venice, we will reside at the 4-star luxury Starhotels Splendid Venice, recently handsomely renovated, situated near Piazza San Marco, rated by “Trip Advisor” as the top 18th hotel out of 450 in Venice. The welcoming and attentive staff will make our stay even more memorable.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and Pamela Huntington Darling, specializing in organizing inimitable cultural travel programs, welcome you to join us for this exclusive cultural program.

Tour Price: Land cost: Double occupancy: $7,500 per person. Single occupancy guests may choose between: (1) $950 single supplement with Villa Cipriani & Starhotels Splendid Venice; or (2) $600 single supplement with Hotel Duse & Starhotels Splendid Venice. Based on an exchange rate of $1.40/1 Euro and a minimum of 15 participants (maximum 20 participants); plus a fully tax-deductible $500 donation to ICAA.

Rate includes: 7 days of private visits and receptions; 7 nights of hotel accommodations—3 nights at the 4-star luxury hotel Villa Cipriani (or 3-star Hotel Duse: single occupancy) in Asolo and 4 nights at the 4-star luxury Starhotels Splendid Venice; 7 breakfasts; 7 luncheons and 6 dinners; transportation to and from events; all private visits, and expert lecturers.

Reservations and Information: For more information and to reserve, please e-mail or call Pamela Huntington Darling at your earliest convenience. E-mail: pdarling@exclusiveculturaltours.com. Tel.: Paris: 011 33 1 45 67 62 81. Please be sure to include your daytime and evening phone number in any and all correspondences.

Confirmation of reservation will be treated according to reception date of registration.

To assure availability, please reserve now. Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

Click here to view a list of daily highlights.


The Hamptons: Country Houses of the American Riviera

September 30–October 4, 2011

Some call it the American Riviera. And with good reason. Like its French namesake, the American Riviera, known to all as “The Hamptons,” is second home to the rich and famous and the rich and not-so-famous (but they’re there to do something about it). Such resort towns as Westhampton, Southampton, Water Mill, Bridgehampton, and East Hampton come under the umbrella of The Hamptons. There is irony in the fact that these villages were settled by Puritans in the 17th century.

In the 1800s, affluent city dwellers began to travel to this eastern end of the island seeking cool sea breezes, pristine beaches, relaxed country living and a well-organized social life. By 1872, the Long Island Rail Road reached as far as Bridgehampton. Eventually there was the automobile and the Long Island Parkway to transport vacationers. There were those who had the convenience of owning a yacht that could commute them to and from Manhattan. Later, there were private seaplanes, then helicopters for ease and speed.

Destinations through the decades were fabulous country houses designed by McKim, Mead & White, Harrie T. Lindeberg, Grosvenor Atterbury, Cross & Cross, F. Burrall Hoffman, Jr., John Russell Pope, Trowbridge & Livingston among others and gardens by Marion Cruger Coffin, Ferruccio Vitale, and Rose Standish Nichols (“Many gardens have ‘arrived’ because a man’s brawn has been directed by a woman’s brain”).

The Hamptons has always attracted members of the elite world of artists, Thomas Moran, Winslow Homer, Childe Hassam, Jackson Pollock, and Lee Krasner among them. The number of art establishments in East Hampton gave the town the nickname “the American Barbizon.” Southampton was home to the Shinnecock Summer School of Art led by William Merritt Chase, and the Parrish Art Museum has existed since 1898.

Today, the Hamptons remain a mix of year-round communities and active summer resorts attracting summer-home owners and vacationers. Rolling farmland and vineyards mingle with historic villages, sophisticated restaurants and shops and spectacular mansions and farms.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America invites you to enjoy an exclusive tour of the Hamptons during the area’s pleasant weather of late September and early October, thereby avoiding peak-season crowds and traffic. There will be a variety of private homes and gardens to visit and exclusive functions to attend, along with stops at houses designed by renowned architects of yesterday and today. Our guide and lecturer will be architect Gary Lawrance, co-author with architect Anne Surchin of Houses of The Hamptons: 1880-1930 (Acanthus Press, 2007). Much of the information found in our announcement is drawn from their book.

In addition, a private motor coach has been reserved and comfortable four-star accommodations for four nights have been secured at the Southampton Inn, 91 Hill Street, Southampton, NY 11968, (631) 283-6500.

Tour Price: Land cost is $2,450.00 based on double occupancy; a single supplement is $275. A tax-deductible $500 donation to ICA&CA is included in the tour price.

Reservations and Information: Please send an e-mail message to Tom Hayes at Classical Excursions at tom@classicalexcursions.com or call (413) 243-4155.

Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

In addition, participants are required to make an additional $500 contribution to the Institute—which is included in the land cost—which helps to further our mission of advancing the practice and appreciation of the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. This contribution is fully tax-deductible.

Images: Shinnecock Hills from Houses of the Hamptons (1880–1930), Private home, East Hampton, photo by Steven Brooke Playing golf at the James Parrish House


Classicism in Denmark: 18th Century Manor Houses to 20th Century Modern Design

Saturday, September 17–Monday, September 26, 2011

Arranged by Classical Excursions


Join us on our premiere tour of Classicism in Denmark, expertly arranged by Lani Summerville of Classical Excursions and led by Ulla Lunn, one of the top preservation architects in Denmark. Denmark is the southernmost of the Scandinavian countries and therefore the most continental. Denmark’s topography is greatly varied with wide fields, moors, and forests with more than 480 islands along a beautiful coastline. Denmark is an architectural destination not to be missed: From its picturesque villages with colorful half-timbered houses to its majestic castles, manor houses, Viking ruins, and, of course, the bold Danish Modern movement.

This exclusive nine-day tour will introduce participants to the finest historical properties in Denmark, including 18th century manor houses; royal residences, and gardens; exceptional museums; and culminating with an introduction to the Danish Modern style and such design giants as Arne Jacobsen and Poul Henningsen.

Like neighboring Sweden, Denmark experienced a Golden Age within the world of art, architecture, and decorative arts. Two devastating fires in Copenhagen during this period left leading architects of the era with opportunity to rebuild the capitol of Copenhagen in the latest neo-classical style.

On this tour participants discover both the Classical Copenhagen—at its peak during the 18th century with contributions by such architects as C.F. Hansen’s Christenborg Palace and Gottlieb Bindesboll’s Thorvaldsen Museum—as well as the Danish Modern.

Tour Highlights:

A four -night stay on the island of Funen at the glorious Hindsgavl Castle, now operating as a historic hotel.

A five-night stay in Central Copenhagen at a lovely four-star hotel

A private tour of Liselund, a magical 18th-century manor house. This small thatched-roof palace, set in the fairytale-like atmosphere of a picturesque park on a lake, contains an amazing collection of late 18th century interiors.

A private tour of Frederiksberg Castle, a Baroque masterpiece and now the Royal Military Academy.

A visit to an Arne Jacobsen-designed compound from the 1930s, consisting of dwellings, a restaurant and a theater.

A visit to Solyst, the 18th century summer residence of Count Schimmelman, currently used as a hunting lodge for Danish bourgeoisie.

A private visit to the rarely seen Thotts Palace, now the French Embassy in Copenhagen.

A very special visit to the Private Royal Garden and Orangerie at the Queen’s residence, Fredensborg Castle. This is the grandest royal garden in all of Denmark and not open to the general public.

A tour of the privately owned Ledreborg Mansion and gardens designed in 1742 in the Rococo style.

A luncheon and tour of Sanderumgard (circa 1790), with its proprietor Susanne Vind.

The beautiful 18th century Glorup Manor.

Tours of the National Museum, Design Museum, and Thorvaldsen Museum.

An evening concert in the Concert Hall, designed by modernist Vilhelm Lauritzen.

A visit to the Moravian village of Christiansfeld founded in the year 1173 by the Moravian Church to as a sanctuary in Denmark. The beautiful unity of the church, houses, and gardens are being considered as a Unesco World Heritage Site.

A visit to Knabstrup Mansion, a small private house and garden belonging to the Lunn Family for 235 years. The visit includes tours of the main house, Forester’s Cottage, and the Orangerie.

A visit to a private garden in Holte, belonging to a famous Danish Landscape architect Ms. Jane Schuel.

The above tour highlights are a partial listing as of August 12, 2011.

Tour Price: Land cost is $4,650.00 per person based on double occupancy. A single supplement of $500 applies. Limited spaces are available at this time and a tax-deductible $500 donation to the Institute is included in the tour price.

Reservations and Information: To assure availability, please reserve now. Please send an e-mail message to Lani Summerville, Classical Excursions at lani@classicalexcursions.com or call (413) 528-3359. Please include your daytime and evening phone number in any and all correspondences.

Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

In addition, participants are required to make an additional $500 contribution to the Institute—which is included in the land cost—which helps to further our mission of advancing the practice and appreciation of the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. This contribution is fully tax-deductible.


Private Classical Paris

Saturday, September 10–Saturday, September 17, 2011

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling, Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs

Click here for a list of highlights.


In view of the continuing success of ICA&CA’s Private Classical Paris tour, offering exceptional access to France’s emblematic sites of the finest in classical architecture, decorative arts, and gardens, we are pleased to propose this exclusive program of unrivaled private visits and receptions with prominent officials, hosts, and experts.

During seven extraordinary days, Private Classical Paris will offer participants exemplary, behind-the-scenes visits to sites representing the most significant examples of French classical architecture, designed by François Mansart, Louis Le Vau, Antoine Lepautre, Jules Hardouin Mansart, Ange-Jacques Gabriel, and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux; and outstanding private residences—boasting the finest in decorative arts and gardens.

Guests will enjoy private access to ambassadorial residences, renowned French institutions, private residences and châteaux of distinction owned by members of the French nobility and private art collectors, most inaccessible to the public, housing the highest level of décor, rare and extensive collections of artwork, many with admirable gardens, led by knowledgeable experts, as well as private receptions and dinners at remarkable residences.

For the first time this year, we will also discover famous Art Deco private residences with an Art Deco architect.

Participants will reside at the sister hotels, next to each other, located in the aristocratic area of Saint-Germain-des-Près, both favourite hotels of interior designers: Double occupancy Superior Rooms: Hotel Saint Vincent; 5, rue du Pré aux Clercs; 75007 Paris; www.hotelsdufaubourgsaintgermain.com. Single occupancy Deluxe Rooms: Hotel Lenox Saint Germain; 9, rue de l’Université; 75007 Paris; next to Hotel Saint Vincent; www.hotelsdufaubourgsaintgermain.com. The rooms in both hotels are nicely furnished with marble bathrooms.

To assure participants full enjoyment of this significant program and to recuperate from transatlantic travel, we suggest arrival a day in advance. Extra nights at the hotel can be arranged for you.

The program is limited to 20 participants (15 participants minimum). Reservations will be treated according to the date of registration. The full itinerary and descriptions will be sent to the participants.

We look forward to welcoming you in Paris for this exclusive and memorable program!

Tour Price: $7,000 per person based on double occupancy; $1,000 single supplement applies; based on an exchange rate of $1.35/1 Euro; on a minimum of 15 participants (maximum 20); plus a tax-deductible $500 donation to ICA&CA.

Rate includes: 7 days of private visits and receptions; 7 nights of accommodation in a 3-star luxury boutique hotel; all breakfasts, 5 luncheons, cocktail receptions, and 4 dinners in private residences; costs involved in the program, transport to and from events during the tour, all private visits, expert lecturers, etc.

Reservations and Information: For more information and to reserve, please email or call Pamela Huntington Darling at your earliest convenience. E-mail: pdarling@exclusiveculturaltours.com. Tel.: Paris: 011 33 1 45 67 62 81. Please be sure to include your daytime and evening phone number in any and all correspondences.

Confirmation of reservation will be treated according to reception date of registration.

Due to the exceptional character of certain private visits and receptions proposed in this program, to which access is highly exclusive, if a venue is cancelled by the host, it will be replaced by a visit or reception of equal quality, and guests will be notified.

To assure availability, please reserve now. Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.


Rome Drawing and Painting

June 11 – 18, 2011


Don’t miss this opportunity to experience Rome while honing your observational drawing skills. Participants at all levels will be provided with a practical knowledge of the classical tradition as manifested in Rome, instruction in Italian art and architecture, and ample opportunity for the observation and representation of classical architecture. Experienced instructors of the Institute and affiliated institutions lead this signature study and drawing tour; the tour is open to all architects, artists, and like-minded individuals.

Application Deadline EXTENDED: April 15, 2011.

For further details or questions, please contact rometour@classicist.org.

INSTRUCTOR BIOS

Richard Wilson Cameron

Richard Cameron was educated at the University of Toronto and Princeton.  He also spent a year in Rome teaching for the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Studies Program.  In 1992 Richard co-founded the Institute of Classical Architecture (now the Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America). Richard has taught drawing and the history of architectural theory at the Institute since its foundation, and currently serves on the board of Directors as its Vice-Chairman.  He is also the Chairman of the Institute’s Education Committee.  He was awarded first prize in the Royal Oak Foundation’s Annual Architecture Competition in 1993.  His work has appeared in House and Garden; The New York Times; Period Homes; New Old House; Traditional Building; and various other books and journals throughout his career.  

Michael Djordjevitch

Michael Djordjevitch studied Architecture at the University of Toronto, receiving his B. Arch in 1979.  He then worked at the Royal Ontario Museum and taught at the School of Architecture of the University of Toronto, while taking courses in Art History.  His principal teacher was Prof. Hans Luecke.  In 1988 he was accepted into the History and Theory Program of the School of Architecture of Princeton University, receiving his Masters in 1991.  The following year he was received into the Graduate Program of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, completing the program and becoming a Fellow of the School in 1993.  Throughout the 90’s he worked as one of the two Architects for the Agora Excavations of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  In 2001 be began to teach for the Architecture Program of the University of Notre Dame in Rome.  Following the completion of his term in 2003, he was invited to the home campus as a visiting critic for the next several years. 

Patrick Connors

Patrick Connors is a 1980 graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Certificate Program. There, he studied primarily under Arthur DeCosta and was awarded the Perspective Prize. In 1982 he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. His work is exhibited internationally and in the past decade has been in solo or group venues at the National Academy of Design, New York Academy of Art, Butler Institute of American Art, Meredith Long & Company, Pierrepont Fine Arts, Arcadia Gallery, and Hirschl & Adler Galleries. His paintings, drawings, designs, and murals are included in private and public collections. In 2002, Connors was awarded an Oxford University Summer Residency Fellowship in painting and anatomy. In 1998 he was awarded a Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant for painting and in 1999 was the select alternate for a Senior Research Fulbright Scholarship for Italy. He teaches in the Graduate School of the New York Academy of Art, Grand Central Academy of Art, Institute of Classical Architecture, Studio Incamminati, and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Among the institutions at which he has lectured are Yale University Art Gallery, Water Street Atelier, Drexel School of Medicine, Classical America: Philadelphia Chapter, the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In fall 2009 he was a visiting artist at Savannah College of Art and Design.

Instructors: *Richard Cameron*, Architectural Designer and ICA&CA Vice Chairman; *Michael Djordjevitch*, Architect; *Patrick Connors*, Fine Artist and GCA Faculty Member.


English Country Houses of Sir Edwin Lutyens

May 19-26, 2011

Known for his masterful synthesis of traditional rural forms and brilliant, inventive use of classicism, the reputation of Sir Edwin Lutyens (1869-1944) was founded on the many vernacular country houses he designed throughout his 50-year career. He was considered the leading British architect of his generation, and today is widely admired by architects and designers alike.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America in conjunction with Classical Excursions has arranged an exclusive six-day tour with access to privately owned country residences designed by Lutyens in southeastern England, including some not normally open to the public. The privately guided tour will include an introductory lecture by author and Lutyens scholar Gavin Stamp and a talk by Margaret Richardson, a scholar of both Lutyens’ built work and drawings.

Along the way, there will be stays in charming country inns and hotels and meals in equally atmospheric rural restaurants.

Tour Highlights

A private tour of Millmead (1906), Bramley, Surrey, a collaboration of Lutyens and England’s great garden designer, Gertrude Jekyll. Here one finds an informal Classicism, with the use of local rubble stone, red tile and bricks. The house was first opened to the public in 2004 during an ICA&CA Lutyens tour.

A major highlight of the tour is Munstead Wood (1896), near Godalming, Surrey, Gertrude Jekyll’s house designed by Lutyens and considered the most complete blend of their talents. The use of indigenous materials from an overall Arts and Crafts picturesqueness.

A visit to Goddards (1899), Abinger Common, Surrey, discloses a splayed U-shape, which is symmetrical overall with asymmetrical elements following Arts and Crafts ideals. The courtyard garden was designed in collaboration with Gertrude Jekyll.

A morning at Great Dixter (1910), Northiam, Sussex, reveals Lutyens’ work at joining two extremely fine and original Tudor houses with additions of his own design. We will tour the house and the famous garden created by the late owner and prominent landscape designer Christopher Lloyd.

A tour of the privately owned Salutation (1912), Sandwich, Kent, shows a unique Lutyens interpretation of early Georgian architecture. With the advent of the Edwardian era, renewed interest in the eighteenth-century style took hold.

Privately owned Folly Farm (1901–1912), Sulhamstead, Berkshire, is Lutyens’ combination of an initial symmetrical composition in the manner of William and Mary Classicism and his later romantic additions of sweeping roofs, colossal chimneys and weather-boarded gables.

An exclusive tour of Berrydown Court (1898), Ashe, Hampshire, introduces the visitor to a complex Arts and Crafts façade that gives the impression of add-ons built over several generations. The owner and architect will join the group for a discussion of the recently completed restoration.

Subject to some changes and additions.

Tour Price: Land Cost is $3,950.00 per person based on double occupancy. A single supplement of $700.00 applies. A tax-deductible $300 donation to ICA&CA is included in the tour price. Please call Tom Hayes at Classical Excursions to register (413) 528-3359 or contact@classicalexcursions.com.

Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

In addition, participants are required to make a contribution to the Institute’s Annual Fund—which help to further our mission of advancing the practice and appreciation of the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. This contribution is fully tax-deductible.


A Grand Tour of Classical Sicily from Palermo to Taormina

April 8-17, 2011

“To have seen Italy without seeing Sicily is not to have seen Italy at all, for Sicily is the clue to everything.” – Goethe, Italian Journey

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America in conjunction with Classical Excursions announces its second tour to Sicily. Following the tradition of the most adventurous Grand Tourists of the 18th and early-19th centuries, participants will discover the exotic allure of the Mediterranean’s largest island, which has been host to a spectacular number of cultures throughout its history. The Greeks, Romans, Carthaginians, Arabs, Normans, Spanish, and Italians have all left their distinctive mark.

The tour begins in bustling Palermo and progresses to the famous Valley of the Temples at Agrigento. Three nights are spent in Ortygia, the island city of ancient Siracusa, with daytrips to Ragussa Ibla and Noto, as well as excursions and walking tours within the city of Siracusa. The last night of the tour is spent in picturesque Taormina at the luxurious waterfront Grand Hotel Timeo.

TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

The magnificent temples of Agrigento includes the Temple of Concord, one of the world’s best-preserved Greek temples.

Palermo’s wealth of Norman, Catalan-Gothic, Baroque and Neoclassical architecture under the shadow of Monte Pellegrino.

The extraordinary mosaics of the Villa del Casale, the 3rd century A.D. summer villa built for a member of the Roman imperial family.

The awe-inspiring and mysterious unfinished Doric Temple at Segesta.

The theatrically baroque cities of Ragusa Ibla and Noto, both rebuilt after the devastating earthquake of 1693 and filled with flamboyant palazzi and breathtaking perspectives.

The surreal Duomo of Siracusa with Greek Doric columns and metopes exposing its temple origins behind an exuberant baroque façade on one of Italy’s most beautiful piazze.

The picturesque resort of Taormina with its Greek/Roman theatre and breathtaking views of Mount Etna and the Ionian Sea.

Dinner parties in private palazzi:  The age-old Palazzo Federico in Palermo with its Norman tower and sumptuous suites of rooms; the elegant pink Palazzo Beneventano del Bosco on Siracusa’s sublime Piazza del Duomo; and the exuberant Palazzo Biscari in Catania famed for its extravagant ballroom.

Tour Price: Land cost is $4,500.00 per person based on double occupancy. A single supplement of $700.00 applies. A tax-deductible $300 donation to ICA&CA is included in the tour price. Please call Lani at Classical Excursions to register (413) 528-3359 or contact@classicalexcursions.com

Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

In addition, participants are required to make a contribution to the Institute’s Annual Fund—which help to further our mission of advancing the practice and appreciation of the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. This contribution is fully tax-deductible.


Private New York 2010 – SOLD OUT

December 2-5, 2010

New York City has been a canvas for celebrated architects, designers and craftspeople for centuries. It continues to be a metropolis whose evolution is mentored by a steadfast legacy of those who have contributed to the lifetime of the city. We must therefore keep coming back to see and be inspired. The 2010 Private New York educational tour continues the tradition of seeing first hand remarkable architecture and interiors of the past and present.

As a highlight of this year’s tour we will be given a special tour of the Woolworth Building designed as a neo-gothic “Cathedral of Commerce” in 1910 by Cass Gilbert. As a monument to his empire, Frank W. Woolworth spared no expense in building the, then, tallest building in the world. Located just blocks from what is now known as “ground zero,” The Woolworth Building remains one of the greatest treasures of New York City.

As with past years we are pleased to be granted access to several classic houses and apartments where private patronage meets individual style. Places we will see include works by past greats John Russell Pope, Warren & Wetmore, and Rosario Candela. And by current architects and designers Fairfax & Sammons, Cullman & Kravis, Steven Gambrel. We will also visit a Riverside Drive mansion, built in an era where houses here were being built to rival the best houses of Fifth Avenue.

While the tour largely exhibits traditional design we are also seeing some very special residence showing more contemporary interpretations on architecture and design within framework of older buildings. These will include an Upper East Side apartment designed wholly by the great modernist architect Paul Rudolph, a Greenwich Village house done by a collaboration of DD Pei and Calvin Tsao, and the Soho loft residence and office of designer Robert Couturier.

New York City’s private club’s represent another splendid product of design patronage. This year we are pleased to be hosted in several of these distinguished clubs for tours and meals. These will include the beautiful 1915 home of the Knickerbockers Club, designed by society architects Delano & Aldrich. This is considered by some to be one of the most beautiful Georgian style buildings in America. Our club visit will also take of to the National Arts Club, located on Gramercy Square, the last remaining private park in New York City. The club is housed in the 1840 Tilden Mansion which was later “Victorianized” by architect Calvert Vaux who designed many of the structures in Central Park.

Members at the Contributor or Individual ~ Professional level or higher are welcome to attend our tours. Members at the Donor level and higher receive Priority Registration E-alerts before the general public. Join online today or call (212) 730-9646, extension 104 to upgrade your membership.

In addition, participants are required to make a contribution to the Institute’s Annual Fund—which help to further our mission of advancing the practice and appreciation of the classical tradition in architecture and the allied arts. This contribution is fully tax-deductible.


Private Classical Paris

September 12–18, 2010

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling, Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs
Paris.jpg In view of the success of the Private Classical Paris tour in 2008 and 2009, offering a rich variety of decorative arts and architecture, we are pleased to announce an exclusive 6-day, 6-night program of exceptional private visits and receptions with their prominent hosts and experts, to take place during the renowned international art and antiques fair, the “Biennale des Antiquaires.”

During six extraordinary days, Private Classical Paris will offer participants exemplary, behind-the-scenes visits to sites representing the most significant examples of French classical architecture, designed by François Mansart, Louis Le Vau, Antoine Lepautre, Jules Hardouin Mansart, Jacques-Ange Gabriel, and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux; as well as outstanding private residences.

Guests will enjoy private access to ambassadorial residences, to renowned French institutions, to private residences and châteaux of distinction owned by members of the French nobility and private art collectors, many inaccessible to the public, housing the highest level of décor, rare and extensive collections of artwork, lead by knowledgeable experts, as well as private receptions and dinners at remarkable residences with the proprietors.

Participants will reside at the sister hotels that are next to each other, located in the aristocratic area of Saint-Germain-des-Près, both favourite hotels of interior designers: Double occupancy Superior Rooms: Hotel Saint Vincent; 5, rue du Pré aux Clercs; 75007 Paris; www.hotelsdufaubourgsaintgermain.com. Single occupancy Deluxe Rooms: Hotel Lenox Saint Germain; 9, rue de l’Université; 75007 Paris; next to Hotel Saint Vincent; www.hotelparislenoxsaintgermain.com. The rooms in both hotels are very nicely furnished, spacious and have marble bathrooms. You can visualize them on the websites.

In order to assure participants full enjoyment of this significant program and to recuperate from transatlantic travel, we suggest arrival a day in advance. Extra nights at the hotel can be arranged for you at negotiated rates.

NEW LOWER PRICE! Tour Price: $6,000 $6,200 per person based on double occupancy; $600 single supplement applies; $5,250 $5,500 without hotel; based on an exchange rate of $1.30/1 Euro (originally $1.35); on a minimum of 12 participants (maximum 18 participants); plus a tax-deductible $300 donation to ICA&CA.

Rate includes: 6 days of private visits and receptions; 6 nights of accommodation in a 3-star luxury boutique hotel; all breakfasts, all luncheons, cocktail receptions, and 3 dinners in private residences; costs involved in the program, transport to and from events during the tour, all private visits, historian, etc.

For more information and to reserve, please email or call Pamela Huntington Darling at your earliest convenience. Email: pdarling@eventsofprestige.com Tel.: Paris: 011 33 1 45 67 62 81

To assure availability, please reserve before June 15, 2010.

The program is limited to 18 participants (12 participants minimum). Reservations will be treated according to the reception date of participant registration.

Tour highlights by clicking here.


Rome Drawing and PaintingRegister Now!

Seven Day Program: Saturday, June 12 – Saturday, June 19, 2010

Back Cover Image: Ancient Italy - Ovid Banished from Rome by J.M.W. Turner, 1838 The ICA&CA is pleased to once again offer a classical architecture study program and drawing tour in Rome. Led by experienced faculty of the Institute and affiliated institutions, the program is open to architects, artists, and like-minded individuals. This signature tour will offer instruction in Italian art and architecture history, and opportunities for the observation and representation of classical architecture. Instructors will aim to provide participants at all levels with a practical knowledge of the classical tradition as manifested in Rome. Tour highlights include Ancient and Renaissance Rome, Villa Lante, Caprarola, and Rome’s great collections (Villa Borghese & Doria Pamphili). Travel arrangements to Italy are the responsibility of the participant. A tuition deposit, due by March 1, is required along with a registration form to hold a place in the program. Full payment covering outstanding tuition and fees is due by May 1. For further details, contact Leah Aron, Managing Director of Education, at laron@classicist.org.

Instructors: Michael Mesko, Architect and ICA&CA Fellow; John Woodrow Kelley, Fine Artist and ICA&CA Fellow; John Varriano, Art Historian, Professor, Mount Holyoke College


Private Buenos Aires: Paris on the Plata

Saturday, May 15 – Saturday, May 22, 2010

Arranged by Classical Excursions
Casa Rosada “Buenos Aires, just as a mistress, when you are far away it is better to love you, and to say, all life through, I’d rather die than forget you.” –Lyrics from the tango Buenos Aires

Nostalgically described as la Reina del Plata (The Queen of the River of Silver), Buenos Aires, with its humble beginnings as a 16th century Spanish outpost, has with time undergone extraordinary transformations politically (often contentious during the 20th century), economically (stability and stagnation) and architecturally (a world-renowned city of great beauty). Considered South America’s most cosmopolitan city, the sprawling Argentine capital is an irresistible blend of politics, history and culture, uniting European style with Latin passion.

The city’s portenos or port residents have an infectious love of life. You will find a richness and variety of its population, its cuisine, its architecture ranging from Spanish Colonial to an amazing wealth of Beaux Arts and Art Deco rivaling none other than Paris itself. From the grand boulevards, the imposing Belle Epoque buildings fronting Avenida de Mayo (the political center of Argentina), the opulent barrios or neighborhoods of Retiro and Recoleta, to the cobbled stoned plazas and tango clubs of old San Telmo, Buenos Aries never refrains from enticing the visitor.

This and more make up the Institute of Classical Architecture and Classical America’s Private Buenos Aires: Paris on the Rio de la Plata tour, the organization’s first travel foray to South America. You will be guests for seven nights at the very elegant boutique hotel, Casa Sur Art, located in the chic Recoleta neighborhood. The hotel owner has planned special accommodations and will host a welcoming wine tasting reception.

Selected Highlights

A private walking tour led by one of Buenos Aires’ celebrated architects, exploring the neighborhoods of Recoleta, the Micro center, San Telmo, Puerto Madero and colorful La Boca.

A tour and cocktail reception of a privately owned Recoleta penthouse apartment.

A private luncheon at the exclusive Buenos Aires Yacht Club, a renowned Art Deco building located harbor side.

Visits to several private homes, apartments and art collections within the city.

Exclusive tours of the Brazilian and French embassies, two architectural masterpieces.

A day trip by private boat to the town of Tigris with a tour of the Parana Delta system and lunch at a local island restaurant. Tigris is known for its boating clubs, regattas and the famous fruit market.

A day trip to the historic Spanish colonial town of San Antonio de Areco, the gaucho capital of Argentina. Included will be an asada or barbecue at a privately owned enstancia (gaucho ranch) and gaucho demonstration.

A seven night stay at the boutique hotel Casa Sur Art, located in the chic Recoleta neighborhood. Our stay includes a complimentary Argentine wine tasting reception.

An evening Tango performance and dinner at a local club.

Register

Click here to learn how to register.

Sponsors

Arranged by Classical Excursions.


Exclusive Provence: Private Residences, Gardens & Gallo-Roman Discoveries

April 25 – May 1, 2010

Arranged by Pamela Huntington Darling, Exclusive Cultural Travel Programs
This exclusive tour, designed for enthusiasts of Provence and its celebrated French Art of Living, offers private visits and receptions with their hosts at remarkable 17th and 18th century chateaux, residences and gardens, most inaccessible to the public, as well as private, expert-guided visits to outstanding Gallo-Roman sites, an inspiration to Classical Architecture, many recently and admirably restored.

We will travel through beautiful Provence and be welcomed by the proprietors of outstanding private residences and chateaux, several owned by members of the French nobility, some of which were built on Gallo-Roman sites, most inaccessible to the public. These residences feature unique architecture, décor, and noteworthy collections of art. We will visit some of the most impressive private gardens in Europe, cited by the French government as “Jardins Remarquables.”

We will discover with experts the major Gallo-Roman sites of the world and their latest revelations, some listed UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites, many recently and splendidly restored. Perhaps in no other colony of the Roman Empire did the Roman civilization achieve such astounding results as in Provence, priding major, remarkably preserved monuments of the Roman world. During the last 20 years, these Gallo-Roman sites have been extensively researched by experts.

To date, little or nothing has been published for the layman of the last 20 years of research. However, thanks to the experts who will guide us on our visits, we will gain first-hand knowledge of the latest discoveries and a more accurate understanding of Gallo-Roman civilization, the use of their monuments, their building techniques, and their meaning. Among our significant visits, we will view the unique Roman treasures discovered in 2007 in the Rhone River during archaeological excavations carried out by the French government, now on exhibit in Arles.

We will stay at the Château des Alpilles in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, a 19th century former private residence set in a vast park, and at La Mirande in Avignon, housed in an 18th century private mansion next to the Palace of the Popes. Both 4-star luxury hotels offer refined detail and décor, spacious rooms and excellent service.

NEW! Reduced Tour Price: $6,750 $6,000 per person based on double occupancy; $750 $600 single supplement applies, based on an exchange rate of $1.50 $1.38/1 Euro, and a minimum of 12 participants (maximum 15 participants), plus a tax-deductible $300 donation to ICA&CA.

Rate includes: 6 days of private visits; 6 nights of accommodation in 4-star luxury hotels; all breakfasts; 5 luncheons and 5 dinners; costs involved in the program, including transport to and from events during tour, all private visits, expert guides, etc. For more information and to reserve, please email or call Pamela Huntington Darling at your earliest convenience. E-mail: pdarling@eventsofprestige.com. Tel: Paris: 011 33 1 45 67 62 81.

Tour highlights by clicking here.


Southern Classicism in Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region

April 14 – 18, 2010

Arranged by Classical Excursions
Pope Villa, property of Blue Grass Trust As the United States was gaining independence at the end of the 18th century, pioneers were settling in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky. The area offered rich soil, abundant land, and a temperate climate. Lexington emerged as the commercial and economic center of a region of great wealth, despite the decision to make nearby Frankfort the capital of the state in 1792.

Kentucky resembled Virginia with its large farms, formal gardens, and grand mansions—all radiating from Lexington. The genteel residents of the region remained current to East Coast fashions from dress to architecture. Horse breeding and racing quickly became an integral part of life in the bluegrass as horses were imported from Virginia and England.

Today, the Bluegrass Region still retains much of its picturesque natural beauty of gently rolling hills. There are many surviving examples of Georgian, Federal and Greek Revival architecture from the 18th and 19th centuries and newer classical architecture of the 20th century in the 15 counties that presently define the region.

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America, in collaboration with the Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation, is pleased to announce a spring tour of Southern Classicism in Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region April 14 – 18, 2010, a unique excursion of discovery of fabulous classical architecture and interiors. The itinerary will range from the Pope Villa, a rare surviving residence by the great Benjamin Latrobe and now owned by the Blue Grass Trust, to Pin Oak Farm, one of two houses in America designed by England’s eminent classicist Quinlan Terry and an elegant private residence by the New York architectural firm of Fairfax and Sammons.

An abundance of residences and country estates will be opened to us along with privately hosted get-togethers. Participants will have the unique experience of visiting during Lexington’s spring racing season the famed Keeneland Racetrack, whose club house was decorated by the legendary Billy Baldwin. Accommodations for four nights have been reserved at the Gratz Park Inn, a charmingly decorated boutique hotel.

For further information contact Classical Excursions Director Tom Hayes at (413) 243-4155 or tom@classicalexcursions.com.


Private Washington, D.C.

December 2 – 6, 2009

Private Washington, D.C. From its restrained Federal infancy to later flamboyant Beaux Arts opulence, the architecture of Washington DC rose from the ranks of colonial outpost to an international center of diplomacy and society. The Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America is pleased to present an exclusive viewing of some of Washington’s most extraordinary historic and architecturally significant buildings and interiors. Many of these locations which are normally not open to the public include works by McKim Meade & White, John Russell Pope, Horace Trumbauer, and Carrere & Hastings to name a few.

Several magnificent Embassy residences representing nations of Europe, the Middle East, and South America will be visited. Also featured will be entrance to eminent classical rooms of private institutions as well as viewings of some of the most opulent interiors of Government buildings from the city’s 200-year history. We are privileged that the doors of significant private Georgetown, Kalorama, and Embassy Row homes and apartments—many by current acclaimed architects and designers—will be opened to the participants. Various historic private clubs will be host to meals and programs during the tour.

Brought to you by Classical Excursions.


Private Hudson River Valley: Celebrating the Quadricentennial of the Voyage of the Half Moon

September 30 – October 4, 2009

Private Hudson River Valley: Celebrating the Quadricentennial of the Voyage of the Half Moon Come celebrate explorer Henry Hudson’s 1609 discovery of the river later given his name with a fabulous tour of three centuries of some of the region’s finest country-house architecture—Dutch, Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival, Hudson River Bracketed, Beaux Arts, and the latest Classical work. Experts, specialists and homeowners will lead the way.

Select Highlights:
Edgewater (c.1825), is owned by financier Richard H. Jenrette, a collector of some of the East Coast’s finest historic houses. Its proximity to the Hudson River gives it a breathtaking combination of nature and a Federal-style house fronted by a Roman Doric two-story portico. Originally owned by members of the Livingston family, an Italianate library and bay windows were added later by famed architect Alexander Jackson Davis. Mr. Jenrette has filled the house with period antiques, having bought it in 1969 from writer Gore Vidal.

Astor Courts (1906), now a stunningly restored and decorated private home, was originally the 40,000 square-foot sports and guest pavilion for the Ferncliff estate owned by John Jacob Astor IV, who hired Stanford White to design the pavilion. The consulting architect for the restoration and revamping was Samuel G. White, Stanford’s great-grandson. The owners will host a reception for the group.

Teviotdale (c.1773), possesses both Georgian and Federal characteristics, built of stone and brick construction. Owned originally by Walter Livingston, it later was the home of Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamboat, who married Livingston’s daughter, Harriet, in 1808. Of the few 18th century estates located along the Hudson, Teviotdale is the most prominent and intact example of its style and period. The present owner will show us through.

Haight-Gantley House (ca. 1812) stands on a knoll with a commanding view of the river. Legend has it that the mistress of the planned house wanted an oval ballroom and had it constructed while her husband was away fighting the British in the War of 1812. Exquisite detail, from the unusual recessed entrance doorway to the most minor of interior finishes, reveals the sure taste of the builder. We will be given an exclusive tour.

Anson Pratt House (ca.1802-12) has been restored and wonderfully decorated with antique furnishings, colors and materials under the professional hand of one of the owners. Not to be overlooked is the extensive collection of late 19th century and early 20th century paintings. The beautiful details of this charming American Federal country house reflect the style of Robert Adam. The owners will host a lunch for us.

Drumlin Hall was recently built by Peter Pennoyer Architects and decorated by the Thomas Jayne Studio to house a collection of Federal style furniture and Hudson River School and American Impressionist paintings. The pedimented south façade of this spectacular Classical country house commands the long approach from the south, while the north elevation is more romantic in character and heroic in scale. One passes through the front door through a groined vaulted hall, past the spiral staircase and library, to the parlor. Mr. Pennoyer will be our guide.

Additional highlights:
Springwood, Vanderbilt Mansion, Staatsburgh, Howard Hall, Plumb Bronson House, Olana, Crow Hill, Luykas Van Alen House, Lindenwald, James Vanderpoel House, Longfield Farm (newly built and designed by ICA&CA board member Gil Schafer), and Middlefield (architect Gil Schafer’s own Classical home where he will host a brunch). For more information, click here.

Brought to you by Classical Excursions. Reservations and Information: Lani Sternerup (contact@classicalexcursions.com) at Classical Excursions or by calling (800) 390-5536.


Berlin and Potsdam: From Rococo to Karl Friederich Schinkel

September 10 – 16, 2009

The exclusive seven-day tour, planned by Classical Excursions and guided by experts on the area’s historic architecture, will include sites that were inaccessible before the 1990s reunification of Germany. Participants will tour Berlin and Postdam — two adjoining centers of stunning classical, neo-classical, and neo-gothic architecture built during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Join the ICA&CA on this tour and experience firsthand the glorious rococo architecture and interiors ordered by — among others — King Frederick the Great, the multi-talented Prussian patron and practitioner of the classical arts during the Age of Enlightenment. The private tour will continue with visits to the influential neo-classical and neo-gothic work of Prussia’s most famous architect, Karl Friederich Schinkel, who designed public and private buildings so important that his name conjures up a whole era in Prussian culture known as the Schinkelzeit, or Schinkel period. He remains a pivotal figure in the history of architecture. His was a new Prussia with its capital at Berlin which, along with the surrounding Brandenburg countryside, most notably Potsdam, was to become in the late nineteenth century the center of imperial power and culture for a new nation called Germany.

Accommodations will at the chic five-star Hotel Sofitel Berlin Gendarmenmarkt near the Gendarmenmarkt, one of the city’s most beautiful squares, and Unter den Linden, the city’s historic grand avenue within view of the Brandenburg Gate, the quintessential symbol of Berlin.

Brought to you by Classical Excursions.

Itinerary:
Download the PDF


Architectural Drawing Tour of London and Oxford

June 18 – 24, 2009

Christine G. H. Franck, designer and educator who developed ICA&CA’s first architectural drawing tours, will be joined by the distinguished British watercolorist, Alexander Creswell, and other architects, craftsmen and historians in contributing specialized instruction on this first drawing tour in England. The Banqueting House, St. Paul’s Covent Garden, Regent’s Park, Oxford University are just a few of the splendid drawing sites on the itinerary (dates subject to change.)

Brought to you by Classical Excursions.


Rome Drawing and Painting

7 Day Tour: Saturday, June 13 – Saturday, June 20, 2009

Ovid Banished from Rome By Turner The ICA&CA is pleased to again offer a classical architecture study program and drawing tour centered in Rome. Led by experienced faculty of the Institute and following the great tradition of Grand Tour travel, the program will include side trips to the ancient sites situated in Tivoli, Caprarola, Lazio and Ovieto. Open to both architects and artists, the program will offer instruction in Italian art and architecture history and opportunities for the observation and representation of classical architecture, with the aim of providing tour participants at all levels with practical knowledge of the classical tradition as manifested in Rome.

The program includes evening lectures and instruction in perceptual observation and rendering techniques. Tour highlights include Ancient and Renaissance Rome, the sublime Hadrian’s Villa, Tivoli and the magnificent gardens of the Villa d’Este and Rome’s great collections (Villa Borghese & Doria Pamphili). Travel arrangements to Italy are the responsibility of the participant. A tuition deposit, due by March 15, is required along with a registration form to hold a place in the program. Full payment covering outstanding tuiton and fees is due by May 1. For further details, contact Leah Aron, Academic Programs Coordinator, at la@classicist.org. Registration forms may be downloaded or completed online.

Instructors: Michael Grimaldi, Fine Artist, Instructor, Janus Art Academy; Michael Mesko, Architect, Michael Mesko Inc., John Variano, Art Historian, Professor, Mount Holyoke


Inside-Out: Winterthur Garden and House Tour

Winterthur Museum and Country Estate, Wilmington, Delaware Saturday, May 16, 2009; 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM (includes travel time)

Presented in collaboration with the ICA&CA Philadelphia Chapter
Winterthur Garden and House Winterthur, an American country estate nestled in the heart of Delaware’s beautiful Brandywine Valley (halfway between New York City and Washington, DC), is the former home of Henry Francis du Pont (1880 – 1969). In the early 20th century, H. F. du Pont and his father, Henry Algernon du Pont, designed Winterthur in the spirit of 18th- and19th-century European country houses. We will begin our day at Winterthur with a tour of the estate’s grounds and extraordinary flower gardens by landscape designer Kathryn Herman. Following an alfresco boxed lunch, we will hear a talk by Thomas Jayne, Interior Designer and consummate authority on Americana, who will consider H. F. du Pont’s love of nature and how that passion informed his decorative design schemes and collecting. We will then be provided with a guided tour of the house, which contains significant period detailing and an unparalleled collection of antiques.

Lastly, to encourage drawing as an experiential practice enhancing perception and design proficiency, participants will have the option of joining a plein-air watercolor workshop led by artist, architect, and ICA&CA faculty member James Cooper.

Instructors: James Cooper, Architect, James Cooper Studio; Kathryn Herman, ICA&CA Trustee, Landscape Designer, James Doyle Design Associates, LLC; Thomas Jayne, Thomas Jayne Studio Inc.


Eighteenth-Century Sweden: The Golden Age of Gustavian Style

May 15 – 26, 2009

Ovedskloster Manor House In 1771, the future Gustav III returned to his native Sweden from the French court at Versailles to ascend the throne as king after his father’s sudden death. The young monarch had been profoundly inspired by French Neoclassical architecture and decorative arts. Later trips to France and Italy gave further impetus to Gustav’s passion for the Classical. During his reign (1772 – 1792), Sweden rose to a level of architectural and cultural sophistication never known before.

Brought to you by Classical Excursions.


Classical Antebellum Natchez

April 15 – 19, 2009

Overlooking a broad expanse of the Mississippi River and untouched by the ravages of the Civil War, Natchez contains the Deep South’s finest array of Federal, Greek Revival and other style mansions, built between 1800 and 1860 when extravagant prosperity from cotton trade produced more millionaires per capita than any other city in America.

Brought to you by Classical Excursions.


Private Classical, Pascal Paris

Sunday, April 5 – Saturday, April 11, 2009

Paris.jpg Tour Highlights

  • Welcoming Cocktail Buffet Dinner at the Paris Residence of Juan Pablo & Pilar Molyneux
  • Hôtel Lauzun Owned by the City of Paris, architect Le Vau
  • Optional Attendance of Pascal Concerts, Recitals and Services
  • Chancellérie and the Palais de la Legion d’Honneur, Hôtel de Salm, architect Pierre Rousseau
  • Luncheon at the Residence of the Editor of Edward Andrew Zega & Bernd H. Dams
  • École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux Arts and the Chapelle des Petits Augustins
  • Institut de France, architect Le Vau
  • Private visit with the Château’s expert guide of the Petit Trianon, the Pavillon Français, the Chapelle, the Théâtre de la Reine, the English Garden and the Hamlet of Marie-Antoinette
  • Farewell Dinner Reception at the Hôtel du Duc de Gesvres, architect Antoine Lepautre

Click Here for Full Itinerary

As the program will be limited to 18 participants maximum (12 minimum), your response is immediate response is kindly requested.

For reservations and information contact Email Pamela Huntington Darling at pdarling@eventsofprestige.com or by calling Events of Prestige (Paris, France) at 011 33 1 45 67 62 81.


Finland: The Classical Roots of Its Architecture and Design

May 17 – 24, 2008

Sponsored by The Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America
Arrangements by Classical Excursions

One of the great sons of Finland, Jean Sibelius (1865–1957), was once asked what advice he would give a young aspiring composer. He replied “one should consistently avoid the use of unnecessary notes, because every note should have a life of its own.” This philosophy seems fitting in a country where waste is frowned upon and grandeur does not impress.

Whether it’s an eighteenth century manor house or twenty-first-century fabrics designed by Marimekko, Finnish design is known for a simplicity and functionalism that takes its cues from nature. Helsinki was founded in 1550 by the Swedish King Vasa and the city continued to be a major political pawn between Sweden and Russia until 1809, when Finland was lost to Sweden and later absorbed into the Russian empire. After gaining twentieth-century postwar independence, Finland has managed to reassert and advance an extraordinary, recognizable national identity in design as in so many other cultural and social pursuits.

During our week-long tour of Finland, participants will experience the beauty of the elegant and restrained eighteenth-century Sweden, and nineteenth-century Imperial Russia, culminating with Finland’s own unique twentieth-century national romantic aesthetic. Participants will enjoy five nights in Helsinki along with two nights in historic villages in south western Finland’s coastal region.

Tour Highlights

  • A five night stay in Finland’s capital city Helsinki at the renowned Hotel Kamp
  • A private lecture & tour at the Finnish Museum of Architecture
  • Tours of the great eighteenth-century neoclassical compositions of Helsinki’s waterfront including: Market Square, The Kings Gate & The Church of St. Nicholas.
  • Visits to such eighteenth-century Gustavian masterpieces as, Pukkila, Mustio, and Louhisaari manors. Architecturally linked to Sweden and erected during Swedish rule of Finland, these manors have their original interiors intact.
  • Excursions to the picturesque UNESCO World Heritage villages of Porvoo & Rauma. Both retain their historic eighteenth-century town centers, cobbled public squares, and preserved wooden houses from the period.
  • Visits to such national icons as Aalto Alvar’s home and studio, along with Hvittrask, the home and studio of Finnish architect, Eliel Saarinen.
  • A tour of Aalto Alvar’s renowned Villa Mairea, located in western Finland near the village of Pori and considered as canonical in world architectural history as Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Fallingwater.”

Tour Price

$3,500.00 per person based on double occupancy, single supplement of $750.00 per person applies. Immediate registration suggested. Contact Classical Excursions to register, 800-390-5536 or contact@classicalexcursions.com

Brought to you by Classical Excursions.


Jefferson and Palladio in Virginia

April 9 – 13, 2008

Arranged by Classical Excursions

Jefferson and Palladio in Virginia “With Mr. Jefferson I conversed at length on the subject of architecture. Palladio, he said ‘was the bible.’ You should get it and stick close to it…”
Colonel Isaac Coles in a letter to John Hartwell Cocke, 1816

There is no state in the union other than Virginia where the influence of the great Italian Renaissance architect, Andrea Palladio, is as pronounced, that is, influential by way of English Palladianism that reached its maturity in the early eighteenth century. The architect’s drawings were carefully studied by Inigo Jones in the seventeenth century. Palladio’s great book, Il Quattro Libri, which was reproduced and interpreted frequently, became an extraordinary promotional piece for classical architecture worldwide. Even before Jefferson’s time, Palladio’s works reached America through translations of his book, as well as through the writings of such eighteenth-century English architects as Colin Campbell, James Gibbs, and Robert Morris.

But it was Virginia’s own Thomas Jefferson, the architect, who greatly expanded the Palladian influence on American classical architecture. Like Palladio, Jefferson cherished the lessons to be learned from ancient Roman architecture, especially the columned temple. Thanks to him, classical architecture has been the set style for the American government from his Virginia State Capitol and his ideas for the White House and the United States Capitol to hundreds of civic and public buildings built over two centuries. Jefferson, though a man for a democratic society, could never have imagined the sheer numbers of “colonial” houses that dot the American landscape.

As part of its 2008 celebratory program for the 500th anniversary of the birth of Palladio, the Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America is inviting you to join its four-day tour of some of the finest examples of three centuries of Palladian architecture in Virginia. The earliest buildings to be privately visited are such Tidewater plantation houses as Shirley, Brandon, and that icon of American Georgian architecture, Westover.

Central to the scheme of the excursion is time spent in the Charlottesville area with private viewings of Palladian Monticello, the University of Virginia, Edgemont, Mirador, Shack Mountain, and Farmington, as well as other sites.

In Richmond, you will see on a private basis Jefferson’s magnificent State Capitol, the elegant Federal-style Wickham House, Wilton (1753), a Georgian gem where we will have lunch, and Tuckahoe Plantation, Jefferson’s boyhood home, as well as twentieth-century American Palladian houses such as Milburne by architect William Lawrence Bottomley.

Overnight accommodations will be offered at the Beaux Arts classical-style Jefferson Hotel, designed in 1895 by none other than Carrère & Hastings, architects for the New York Public Library, and the Omni Charlottesville Hotel.

Expert lecturers and tour leaders include Calder Loth, senior architectural historian of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources; and K. Edward Lay, Cary D. Langhorne Professor Emeritus of Architecture, University of Virginia, and William Beiswanger, architectural historian for Monticello.

Tour Price

$2,050.00 per person, $375.00 Single supplement. Please contact Classical Excursions for reservations. Limited availability. 800-390-5536 or contact@classicalexcursions.com